News & Events

NU Students to Give Away Thousands Through “Learning Philanthropy” Course

February 6, 2017

This Spring Quarter, Northwestern University students have the opportunity to take the course "Learning Philanthropy: Engaging in the Study and Practice of Giving,” offered by the School of Education and Social Policy, while also awarding cash grants to worthy causes.

“Learning Philanthropy is one of the few courses at Northwestern that challenges you to apply what you learn in the classroom in a real world setting during the course,” said WCAS senior Joji Syed. “Though the course is only one quarter long, the lessons I've learned in it have impacted my perspective for a lifetime.”

Through the course, students learn about the importance of philanthropy in the United States and have the opportunity to donate $74,000 to local nonprofit organizations, funded by the Once Upon a Time Foundation.

“By trusting the students to allocate funds to local organizations, you develop a great sense of responsibility and passion to make a difference in the local community,” Syed said. “You also experience the challenges associated with giving, understanding first-hand the multidimensional characteristic of giving.”

The class, SESP 351, is taught by Penelope Peterson, Dean of the School of Education and Social Policy, and Tracy Dobie, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Learning Sciences.

“It offers a really nice balance between the theory component of really investigating what is philanthropy and what are the challenges, and it also has the practical component where students actually get to give away money,” Dobie said. “Students find it incredibly valuable to have hands-on experience … The balance is something students really appreciate.”

Past recipients of donations have included the Chicago Women’s Health Center, Chicago Coalition for the Homeless, Inner City Muslim Action Network, Chicago Youth Centers and Environmental Law & Policy Center.

“My favorite part was probably just the amount of freedom given to us with choosing what to do with the money and having the real experience as donors,” said SESP sophomore Ruthie Charendoff. “I think it’s a really interesting class for someone interested in nonprofits or who wants to learn more about foundations.”

When SESP senior Jacob Rosenblum took the class, he had the opportunity to visit a variety of poverty alleviation nonprofits in the city before ultimately helping award $20,000 to La Casa Norte, which helps families combatting homelessness in Humboldt Park.

“I enjoyed getting field experience and going to organizations to see what they do and learning how to evaluate which ones you think best fit your theory of change – I didn’t even know what that was until taking the class,” he said.

The class is permission-only, so any undergraduate student is encouraged to apply by Thursday, February 9. Class is held on Tuesdays from 2-5pm during Spring Quarter in Annenberg Hall 303.

“Lots of times students come back and say the course raised more questions than it answered, and that’s OK because we want them to be questioning what it means to be a philanthropist and to give away money wisely and think about best practices,” Dobie said.

Students Explore Museum of Science and Industry with NU in Chicago

January 13, 2017

Nearly 100 members of the Northwestern community visited the Museum of Science Industry during the first weekend of Winter Quarter through a trip sponsored by NU in Chicago, One Book One Northwestern and Student Affairs.

“Going to the MSI with NU in Chicago gave me the opportunity to explore a museum I would've never gone to on my own and provided professor guides who gave cool context and information about the exhibits,” said Weinberg senior Joyce Wang. “It reminded me how much there is to see and learn in Chicago.”

Students had the opportunity to hear from faculty docents at three different exhibits throughout the museum: Fast Forward - Inventing the Future, Science Storms and Genetics and the Baby Chick Hatchery.

Presenters included Associate Professor Joshua Leonard, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Assistant Professor Daniel Horton, Earth and Planetary Sciences, and Associate Professor Pablo Luis Durango-Cohen, Civil and Environmental Engineering.

“I enjoyed the correlation of the speakers to the exhibits, and the freedom and time to roam individually as well,” said Weinberg senior Jourdan Dorrell.

Following the faculty presentations, students had the opportunity to explore the museum before returning to Evanston.

NU in Chicago is an initiative of the Center for Civic Engagement dedicated to better connecting students with civic resources and experiential learning in the city of Chicago. To learn more about future NU in Chicago programming, visit www.nuinchicago.org.

Graduate Students Show up by the Hundreds to Attend TGS Election Watch Party

November 17, 2016

More than 350 graduate students gathered for an Election Watch Party hosted by the Center for Civic Engagement.

Graduate students from a variety of disciplines gathered in Rogers Park to socialize with peers, watch election results and participate in community activities, such as “Swing State Bingo” and a “Down Ballot Lottery.”

“It was wonderful to see graduate students turn out in droves to watch the election of their next president. We doubled the number of people we expected to show up,” said CCE graduate assistant, Anna Bethune. “This event could not have happened without the support of our host committee. Over 20 people signed up to help us recruit graduate students from a diverse array of departments and fields to attend our event."

Student representatives from the Graduate Student Association, the Black Graduate Student Association, the Graduate Leadership Advocacy Council and the Chicago Graduate Student Association also helped plan the event.

“I think we hit a pretty sweet spot with this party because people wanted to watch the election results in a fun environment,” said Lynn Meissner, a third year Human Development & Social Policy PhD student and member of the host committee. “I think an event like this is important for any community to be together to support each other and watch this historical event.”

The Election Watch Party is one of several successful collaborations between The Graduate School over the past few years, including TGS Night Out at the Chicago History Museum and Community Research Workshops.

“A lot of graduate students, because of the nature of graduate work is very isolating and intense, people work lots of hours by themselves and don’t necessarily have very strong community,” Meissner said. “It’s important for us to really build this space to find community in each other and give students an easy way to have something in common with people they’re around.”

AMPED Leaders Present at National Conference

November 15, 2016

Three leaders from the Center for Civic Engagement’s Arts and Music Programs for Education in Detention Centers (AMPED) program presented at the 6th Annual National Conference on Higher Education in Prison in Nashville, Tennessee from November 3-6.

Program coordinator Kerry Brown, lead instructor Justin Zullo, and assistant teacher Jashen Edwards conducted a presentation about their work using hip-hop to connect incarcerated young people with Northwestern students. Their presentation, entitled “Mapping Musical Pedagogies in a Chicago Juvenile Detention Center," explored the challenges involved in building these connections and shared best practices for developing an effective curriculum.

"The AMPED model is unique in its emphasis on reciprocity and critical pedagogy. It was great to share some of these ideas with folks in Nashville while learning from colleagues across the country involved in similar pursuits," said Brown.

Now in its seventh year, AMPED was founded by Dr. Maud Hickey of the Bienen School of Music and is now an initiative of the Center for Civic Engagement.

NU Votes Helps Students Get Out the Vote

November 2, 2016

In anticipation of the upcoming general election, NU Votes is providing the Northwestern University community with a variety of resources to help students vote.

NU Votes is a non-partisan initiative of Northwestern’s Center for Civic Engagement designed to provide the campus community with accessible and understandable information about voter registration and voting procedures. This fall, NU Votes launched a comprehensive online tool that helps students check their registration status, register to vote, update voter registration information and/or request an absentee ballot in any of the 50 states. The website recently compiled a Frequently Asked Questions guide that answers common questions about how, when, and where to vote.

To help make early voting and grace period registration more accessible, the “Voter Van” will be returning to campus to transport members of the to the Evanston Civic Center this week.

“Voter Van is an effort to remove the final barrier to voting, which is getting to the polls,” said Kerry Brown, program coordinator for the Center for Civic Engagement. “We hope to make it as easy and accessible as possible for students to vote, but we also hope to instill a sense of excitement and remind them that voting is something that should be celebrated.”

The Voter Van will be departing from the roundabout near the west entrance of Norris University Center on Wednesday, November 2, Thursday, November 3 and Friday, November 4 starting at 1pm. Vans will be departing every 20 minutes until 6:40pm.

For those who want to take advantage of grace period registration, they must bring two forms of identification. The first can be a photo ID, like a driver’s license or a passport. The second must show their current address and prove that they live in Evanston. A piece of mail, a bank statement or a printout of the address from CAESAR are options.

"The Voter Van is both fun and convenient. It makes voting so much easier and accessible to busy students, and I think it also makes the process of voting feel like more of a communal and shared experience,” said NU Votes staffer Rabeya Mallick.

Those who take a ride in the patriotic van will have the opportunity to review a sample ballot and ask questions of NU Votes staff. The Voter Van is one of the many efforts NU Votes has facilitated this election season to encourage voter engagement, particularly helping nearly 3,000 students with voter registration and absentee ballot requests throughout the fall. Next week, the Center for Civic Engagement will be hosting an Election Watch Party for Northwestern graduate students.

Civic Engagement Paper Receives Award at Conference

October 5, 2016

An academic paper by the Center for Civic Engagement’s director and two graduate students received recognition by the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication and the Kettering Foundation this summer.

The paper, "Digital Democracy in America: A Look at Civic Engagement in an Internet Age,” was a finalist for the AEJMC Presidential Call for Papers on Revitalizing the Bonds of Journalism, Citizenship and Democracy. It was written by Dan A. Lewis, Director of the CCE and Professor of Human Development and Social Policy, along with Jake Nelson, a fourth year doctoral student in the Media, Technology, and Society program, and Ryan Lei, a fifth year doctoral student in the Psychology program.

“Northwestern’s Center for Civic Engagement is a national leader in civic education, and with the recognition from AEJMC, we’re now being recognized for the quality and importance of our research on civic engagement,” Lewis said.

The authors were recognized at the AEJMC annual conference in Minneapolis as one of five finalist papers, receiving a cash award.

“We are very honored to receive this award and greatly appreciate the recognition,” Lewis said. “We’re glad to see scholars in journalism and communication recognize both the quality of the work we’ve done and the focus on the issues that we highlighted.”

Using a longitudinal survey of undergraduate students, this paper finds that digital civic engagement fills the void left by drops in more conventional forms of political participation. Engagement can be enhanced by curriculum that emphasizes civic learning, Nelson said.

“I think what really impressed people about this paper is the more optimistic message it is making about undergraduate involvement and civic engagement generally,” he said. “Undergrads are more civically engaged than they get credit for, and educators can have a bigger role in this.”

The study examines a sample of students’ characteristics before they entered their freshman year and concludes by examining what they’re involved with when graduating. Lewis emphasizes the importance of longitudinal data when it comes to understanding the undergraduate experience and how it is related to civic and political engagement.

“This paper is one of the few that links the online and offline engagement activity to academic experience over time,” he said.

Read the full paper here.

Nearly 200 Students Explore City Neighborhoods with NU in Chicago

September 28, 2016

Buses, each filled with about 40 students, faculty and staff, headed out to neighborhoods across the city through the Center for Civic Engagement’s NU in Chicago program.

“The Center for Civic Engagement could not more pleased with Sunday’s trips,” said Dan Lewis, Professor of Human Development & Social Policy and Director of the Center for Civic Engagement. “Hundreds of students turned out, and with the help of faculty, staff and our student leaders, it was both fun and a wonderful learning experience.”

On Sunday, September 25, nearly 200 students participated in NU in Chicago’s Neighborhood Exploration Day, attending thematic trips into neighborhoods such as Chinatown, North Lawndale and Hyde Park. The day kicked off with a welcome program in Cahn Auditorium, and five tracks relating to different components of community engagement in Chicago were offered throughout the afternoon.

“NU in Chicago is more than just a great way to get out into the city, it's a chance to think critically about urban environments with peers from Northwestern and guidance from faculty,” said Sim Chadha, a junior Communication Sciences and Disorders major. “It's a great way for Northwestern students to get to know each other and get used to spending time off campus. Personally, NU in Chicago has gotten me excited about history and activism in Chicago and has motivated me to become more engaged with city whether through general visits or volunteering and engagement."

Students who attended the Arts in Chicago trip visited the Art Institute of Chicago, the Chicago Cultural Center and the Hyde Park Arts Center. The Immigration & Global Chicago group toured Chinatown and the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum. The Politics in Chicago trip consisted of an activity at Chicago Votes and a visit to Organizing for Action. Participants on the Chicago’s Parks & Public Spaces trip explored Millennium Park and Northerly Island.

Ben Levey, a senior American Studies major, attended the History of Black Chicago trip facilitated by Lewis and activist Prexy Nesbitt, an NU alum and Columbia College professor. The trip included stops at the Martin Luther King Jr. Fair Housing Exhibit Center and the nonprofit organization Free Spirit Media, plus a tour of North Lawndale.

“I enjoyed the NU in Chicago trip because it brought together students from different backgrounds and shared the historical dimensions of the racial problems the city faces today,” Levey said.

Students ended the day with a reception and discussion at the Segal Visitors Center to learn about their peers’ experiences on other trips. NU in Chicago will continue to offer programming throughout the year dedicated to better connecting NU students to Chicago-area civic resources and interactive learning experiences.

"NU in Chicago Neighborhood Exploration Day had the highest attendance of any trip and brought together many students of different backgrounds to explore topics relevant to their interests in Chicago,” said Shoshi Shapiro, a senior studying Learning and Organizational Change who has been on the NU in Chicago planning committee for three years. “It was amazing to see a variety of trip topics as well as sites.”

This event was sponsored by Northwestern's Center for Civic Engagement and Campus Life's Office of Leadership & Community Engagement. For more information, visit the NU in Chicago website.

NU in Chicago’s Neighborhood Exploration Day to Immerse Hundreds of Students in Chicago for a Faculty-Led Day of Learning & Engagement

September 21, 2016

In an effort to encourage experiential learning and community engagement in Chicago, the Center for Civic Engagement’s NU in Chicago program will be hosting a Neighborhood Exploration Day on Sunday afternoon, September 25.

Led by faculty - with additional support from alumni, staff and student leaders - hundreds of students will have the opportunity to attend thematic trips into neighborhoods across Chicago. Students will visit community organizations and meet with civic leaders throughout the city during the program.

"NU in Chicago’s Fall Neighborhood Day is an amazing entry point to Chicago because it lets students choose a topic of interest to them and see how it applies to Chicago,” said SESP senior & Civic Engagement Fellow Shoshi Shapiro. “It is great to help them find their own avenues to civic engagement, and we hope that through this program they see how Chicago can be part of that picture."

Students can participate in one of five tracks relating to different components of engagement in Chicago – Arts in Chicago, Chicago’s Parks & Public Spaces, Chicago’s West Side, Politics in Chicago and Immigration & Global Chicago. Participants will visit a variety of sites including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Martin Luther King Jr. Fair Housing Center and the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum.

The event will start at 12:30pm with a short program in Cahn Auditorium, and students will return to campus around 5pm for a reception and discussion at the Segal Visitors Center. All transportation, admission and refreshment costs are covered for students. Students can register for the event here.

This event is sponsored by Northwestern's Center for Civic Engagement and Campus Life's Office of Leadership & Community Engagement. For more information about this event, visit the NU in Chicago website.

NU Public Interest Program Partners with New Nonprofits & Community Organizations for 2016-2017 Fellowships

September 20, 2016

Entering its 11th year, the Northwestern University Public Interest Program has placed 12 recent graduates at fellowship sites dedicated to promoting the public good throughout Chicago and Evanston.

Fellows in the 2016-2017 cohort will work at a variety of organizations, addressing issues related to education, healthcare, urban planning and more. New NUPIP placement sites this year are Heartland Alliance, Peer Health Exchange, Cradles to Crayons, Daniel Murphy Scholarship Fund and Urban Partnership Bank, a community development bank serving economically distressed communities through access to financial services.

"I have already learned a lot as a fellow at Urban Partnership Bank,” said Cara Conway, SESP ’16. “I was excited to work for a company where my knowledge of community development would help me, and it has been really interesting to supplement that knowledge by learning about the financial sector and how a bank such as UPB can make a difference."

NUPIP is also continuing long-term partnerships with organizations like the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, which has employed seven fellows over the years.

"Working at CMAP through the PIP Fellowship program has given me the opportunity to learn so much more about the inner-workings of Chicago, from the politics and government to infrastructure to different public interest organizations that all come together to improve the city for all of its inhabitants,” said Paige Kaliski, SESP ’16. “And this is exactly why I wanted to do PIP - to understand the details of public interest work, applying what I learned in my social policy major to a dynamic, changing, big city like Chicago."

NUPIP is a one-year fellowship that connects recent graduates with a desire to make social change to paid public interest work. The program is part of Northwestern’s Center for Civic Engagement. In addition to placements with host organizations, fellows participate in thrice-monthly seminars that explore public interest topics and professional development. These seminars are hosted in conjunction with other fellows from the University of Chicago and Princeton University. Between the three programs, there are more than 50 fellows working in the Chicagoland area this year.

Fellows have been placed at the following host organizations:

  • Cara Conway - Urban Partnership Bank
  • Ninah Divine - Northwestern University's Native American and Indigenous People’s Steering Group
  • Arianna Farmer - Chapin Hall
  • Lauren Hamilton - Evanston Township High School
  • Vicky Ho - Chapin Hall
  • Raven Johnson - Heartland Alliance
  • Paige Kaliski - Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning
  • Katherine Koller - Peer Health Exchange
  • Megan Legault - Daniel Murphy Scholarship Fund
  • Yaritza Sandoval - Cradles to Crayons
  • Anjani Sheth - Heartland Alliance
  • Daniel Thiel - Civic Consulting Alliance
  • To learn more about the Public Interest Program, visit the website.

    Northwestern Recognizes Constitution Day 2016

    September 15, 2016

    To commemorate the ratification of the United States Constitution, Northwestern University will recognize Constitution Day on Friday, September 16. Established in 2004 under the leadership of late Senator Robert Byrd, this federal observance recognizes the ratification of the U.S. Constitution, which took place at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787.

    In recognition of Constitution Day, the Center for Legal Studies is hosting an event, “Litigating for Equality” on Thursday, October 6, 2016 from 5-6:15pm in Harris Hall 107. The event will feature Thomas A. Saenz, the President and General Counsel of MALDEF (Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund).

    Additional resources regarding Constitution Day are available through the Center for Civic Engagement. Click here for access to articles, free videos, quizzes, and other information about the U.S. Constitution.

    "Spring into Chicago" Campaign Helps Hundreds of Students Explore Chicago

    June 7, 2016

    Nearly 500 Northwestern students participated in NU in Chicago’s “Spring into Chicago” pilot initiative this quarter, enabling students to explore Chicago through a variety of new events and resources.

    NU in Chicago is a program hosted by Northwestern’s Center for Civic Engagement that helps connect students with civic resources and experiential learning in the city of Chicago. “Spring into Chicago” was a limited-time, pilot initiative of the program for Spring Quarter 2016.

    "Spring into Chicago was incredibly successful because it provided the funds for students to explore the city,” said Shoshi Shapiro, an NU in Chicago co-chair. “People want to go into the city and want to see museums, and us providing the resources made it an easy decision for students to choose to go."

    Through the initiative, students took 585 free CTA rides into the city and students made 159 independent, all-access museum visits to the Adler Planetarium and Chicago History Museum. Within three minutes of releasing May CTA card and museum pass reservations, nearly all resources were reserved.

    “Thinking beyond this quarter, with Northwestern as Chicago's Big Ten School, ‘Spring into Chicago’ also illuminated that there is still a lot of work to do in making Chicago more accessible to students,” said Steffi Brock-Wilson, an NU in Chicago co-chair. “I'm excited to see what small tweaks and big ideas come out of this pilot program.”

    “Spring into Chicago” also included two very popular events to provide students with guided neighborhood exploration opportunities. To kick off the quarter, Northwestern English Professor Bill Savage led students on a bus tour to Chicago’s south and southwest sides to explore hidden gems in the city. “Beyond the Bean: History, Hot Dogs & Hidden Gems of Chicago” took 50 students to visit the Hyde Park site of the World’s Fair hosted by Chicago in 1893, the National Museum of Mexican Art in Pilsen and former Chicago Mayor Daley’s Bridgeport home. Dozens of students also participated in “Life in Chicago: Food, Conversation & Neighborhood Exploration.” Students explored the South Loop and Lincoln Square neighborhoods with civically engaged young alumni living in the city. Students visited key neighborhood sites, including local attractions and restaurants, while learning how alumni have integrated into their new communities upon graduation.

    This pilot was spearheaded by Northwestern students working with the NU in Chicago program. After five years of events and trips through the program, the student leadership team was interested in developing a model for encouraging more independent civic engagement with the city. This initiative was supported by the Center for Civic Engagement, Student Enrichment Services, Office of Campus Life and Associated Student Government.

    CCE Director, Students Release Paper about Online Civic Engagement

    May 10, 2016

    The Center for Civic Engagement’s Director and three students have released a new research paper about college students’ civic engagement habits, called "Digital Democracy at Northwestern: A Look at Civic Engagement in an Internet Age.

    “This paper is the most carefully designed piece of research that looks at what’s going on with Northwestern students in terms of civic engagement,” said Dan Lewis, Director of the CCE and Professor of Human Development and Social Policy.

    The study examines a sample of students’ characteristics before they entered their freshman year at Northwestern, and the study ends with what they’re involved with when leaving campus.

    “It gives us a chance to understand the value-add of an academic civic engagement experience in terms of the kind of citizen that the student is at the end of the time they’re here,” Lewis said.

    The research shows that students who took classes with an emphasis on civic learning were more civically engaged than their peers who had not taken such classes. The students with exposure to these classes even showed increased engagement over time.

    “Online engagement is doing even better for students that took courses that pushed them to think about civic engagement topics,” said Jake Nelson, a third year doctoral student in the Media Technology and Society program.

    Undergraduate college students are more civically engaged online than offline, participating in activities such as reading and posting about politics on the internet. Offline engagement, such as participating in a protest, visiting a public official or writing a letter to a newspaper or magazine, was less common in the students surveyed.

    “It shows a much more optimistic perspective about what college students are up to civically. Offline engagement is down, but online engagement is doing very well,” Nelson said.

    In academic discussions of citizenship, Lewis said there is a tendency to be very negative about millennials’ engagement. However, he notes that the internet creates a new public sphere where people act as citizens, and lots of scholars are too quick to dismiss that.

    “There’s a general notion that our generation isn’t engaged, that we aren’t fulfilling our civic duties and that we are a lazy cohort of people who don’t care about our community,” said Emily Hittner, a first year doctoral student in the Human Development and Social Policy program. “A lot of that rhetoric I would agree with, but that does not really capture how people are using different platforms to become civically engaged. This research adds to understanding of shifting different experiences of civic engagement.”

    In the paper, the authors emphasize the link between online and offline engagement activities and how they don’t undermine, but rather complement, each other.

    “There is often this question of our generation, the millennial generation, being more disengaged, being more adrift, so the paper helps to talk about how and in what ways students are engaging in the broader world around them,” said Ryan Lei, a fourth year doctoral student in the Psychology program.

    The paper concludes educators have an important role in cultivating online and offline political engagement for their students.

    “I’m hoping lots of people on the campus from the President as well as all the students get a chance to understand how important the civic engagement experiences at Northwestern are in terms of the quality and the kinds of citizens that end up graduating from this place,” Lewis said.

    Read the full paper here.

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    CCE Helps Host Conference on Political Engagement in Higher Education

    May 9, 2016

    HECEC

    Administrators, professors, community organizers and students gathered for a collaborative conference on political engagement in higher education on Thursday, April 21 at Loyola University in Chicago.

    Nearly 100 people attended the conference hosted by the Higher Education Civic Engagement Collaborative (HECEC), a coalition of Chicago-area universities committed to working together to more effectively engage the community.

    With a major national election approaching in November, the event focused on the role and responsibilities of colleges and universities when it comes to preparing students to be educated and engaged citizens.

    The day kicked off with remarks from Dan Lewis, Director of Northwestern University’s Center for Civic Engagement. He introduced Cook County Clerk David Orr, who discussed democratic processes and efforts he has taken to make voting easier, such as early voting and same-day registration.

    “We hope the conference marked the beginning, rather than the end, of a conversation about how universities can work together to enhance the political education and electoral participation of students,” Lewis said.

    Conference participants could attend two breakout sessions, touching on a variety of topics such as the new Illinois civics mandate, student voices in political movements and the importance of down-ballot races.

    The event included two keynote speakers: Diana Mutz, Director of the Institute for the Study of Citizens & Politics at the University of Pennsylvania and Nancy Thomas, Director of the Institute for Democracy & Higher Education at the Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life at Tufts University. In her talk, “Does College Promote Democratic Citizenship?,” Mutz discussed cross cutting political discourse, and the ways in which people do or do not surround themselves with others who have different political beliefs. Thomas’ talk, “Educating for Political Citizenship,” touched on the key patterns and characteristics of politically engaged campuses according to research she conducted through the National Study of Learning, Voting and Engagement, which helps colleges and universities learn about their student registration and voting rates.

    The daylong conference concluded with a call to action encouraging participants to start discourse about political engagement on campus.

    “I have been to number of conferences, and what I really enjoyed about this one was that everyone there, participants and presenters, were all coming at the topic from a very practical, very action-based angle. I found that really helpful,” said Jake Nelson, a third year doctoral student in Northwestern’s Media, Technology, and Society program.

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    Civic Engagement Certificate Students Win Grant for Capstone Project

    May 3, 2016

    Allow Good

    A capstone project supported by the Civic Engagement Certificate Program has received a Generous U grant to promote philanthropy education in local high schools.

    Allow Good Northwestern has evolved into a new student group where Northwestern students teach youth at Evanston Township High School and Niles North High School about philanthropy. Allow Good is similar to the “Learning Philanthropy” class offered through SESP where Northwestern students make a $100,000 contribution to a community organization.

    “The mission of Allow Good is to go into our local high schools and teach the kids about philanthropy, civic engagement and social justice and use those lessons to teach about the grant making process and donate $1,000 grants to community,” said SESP sophomore Fannie Koltun.

    The Sillerman Center for the Advancement of Philanthropy at Brandeis University offers the $10,000 Generous U prize to a project that highlights the importance of philanthropic values. The projects were judged on proposals and videos the students submitted.

    Allow Good Northwestern applied for the grant in partnership with a similar program at the University of Chicago, providing each program with $5,000. The group plans to use the money to purchase teaching supplies and fund the $1,000 grants that the high school students gift to local nonprofits.

    “We are excited and thankful. We weren’t sure what was going to happen because it was a nationwide contest,” said Communication sophomore Rachel Sepulveda. “We really want to give students examples of experiential learning.”

    Currently, Allow Good Northwestern is operating in three classrooms, and through the grant money, the group could potentially expand to five classrooms next fall.

    “I think that the students really enjoy it. It’s great to really talk with them, not just about class, but about Northwestern and college in general,” said SESP sophomore Imani Wilson. “I think they’re starting to get a lot more excited about it as the class is in its final stages.”

    Allow Good Northwestern is led by Koltun, Sepulveda, Wilson and SESP junior Matt Herndon. The program received initial funding from the Once Upon a Time Foundation, which supports philanthropic education at universities. Allow Good Northwestern is also supported by Allowance for Good, an Evanston nonprofit focused on developing future philanthropic leaders dedicated to global citizenship and empowerment.

    “It’s been a great partnership. I really like working with them,” Herndon said. “I hope in the future that whoever continues Allow Good, the relationship with Allowance for Good will continue.”

    The Civic Engagement Certificate is a five-quarter, two-year program where students learn about dynamics that impact communities and how to promote asset-based community development in a local context. The certificate components include community engagement service and classroom learning, in addition to the capstone project relevant to a community organization. At the end of this quarter, the Herndon, Koltun and Sepulveda team will finish their capstone project, but Allow Good will continue as a student group on campus.

    “Getting this grant is really an exciting opportunity for us,” Koltun said. “It really solidifies that when we are done with the project in June, it still will continue.”

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    Book Buddies Program Receives Community Engagement Grant

    April 26, 2016

    Book Buddies

    The Book Buddies program has received a $500 Associated Student Government Service and Community Engagement Grant to support the reading program for Evanston preschoolers.

    Book Buddies is a program run by two Jumpstart alumni, senior Ari Farmer and sophomore Caroline Spikner. Farmer and Spikner recruit Northwestern student volunteers to work with preschoolers on Fridays.

    “The program has provided a great opportunity for Northwestern students to engage with the Evanston community and the preschool children are always excited to see their Book Buddies on Friday afternoons,” said Micaela Moran, Northwestern’s Jumpstart coordinator.

    Book Buddies can be a one-time volunteer opportunity or an ongoing commitment for Northwestern students. The Book Buddies program runs about 12 weeks at the Reba Early Learning Center and 12 weeks at the Child Care Center of Evanston, sometimes working in three classrooms at a time.

    “I think it’s exciting because I was very worried we weren’t going to continue the program,” Farmer said. “This year we have so many more volunteers than normal. I hope this will help with sustainability. Since we got the grant, I hope the program gets more attention and volunteers.”

    Every week, Northwestern volunteers work with Laura Antolín, the Children’s Outreach Librarian at the Evanston Public Library. Antolín reads to the children and brings dozens of books to the classrooms. Volunteers then spend time reading with the preschoolers and working on crafts that correspond with the books’ themes.

    “It’s really a wonderful program, and I was happy to facilitate,” Antolín said. “I know it’s important for these kids. The staff and kids really appreciate the Northwestern students.”

    Book Buddies plans to use the grant money to buy craft supplies and also provide a book for each of the participating preschoolers, so the students can build their home libraries.

    “Any time you can add books to a child’s library, it is a good thing,” Antolín said. “A lot of parents work all day and don’t get to the library, so each additional book or reading material we get in a kid’s home is a great chance that they will have some one-on-one time reading with a parent.”

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    High Demand for “Spring into Chicago” Resources Enables Students to Explore Chicago

    Free April weekend CTA cards and museum passes sell out in minutes and high anticipated interest in May resources and new trip means more students can engage with Chicago

    April 15, 2016

    SpringintoChicago

    An overwhelmingly successful launch of the the pilot program “Spring into Chicago” has already helped dozens of Northwestern University students explore Chicago neighborhoods and civic institutions through free CTA cards, museum passes and educational trips during Spring Quarter.

    “Spring into Chicago” is a Spring Quarter initiative of NU in Chicago, a program hosted by Northwestern’s Center for Civic Engagement that helps connect students with civic resources and experiential learning in the city of Chicago.

    “The pilot program for students to check out museum passes and CTA cards has been really exciting thus far,” said Steffi Brock‐Wilson, an NU in Chicago co-­chair. “I wish that more students could participate in the pilot, as it seems to be in high demand.”

    Students had the opportunity to reserve a limited number of CTA passes with pre-loaded fare for up to 10 one-way rides and free passes to either the Adler Planetarium and Chicago History Museum for weekends in April. Within five minutes of launching the online reservation system, almost all of the passes were reserved. More than 100 free museum passes and 70 CTA cards - good for 700 rides total this month - were reserved by Northwestern students in April.

    “After just one weekend, we have already collected a lot of great feedback that will help us design future programming,” Brock-Wilson said. “We look forward to more springtime exploration of Chicago.”

    Reservations for the weekend CTA cards and museum passes for May will go live at 8pm on Tuesday, April 19 at www.nuinchicago.org/register. Students can complete a single reservation for one CTA card and one museum pass for a weekend in May. With the CTA card, students can also visit museums that are already free for students with a WildCARD like the Art Institute and Museum of Contemporary Art. NU in Chicago has also provided information about resources like the Lincoln Park Zoo, Garfield Park Conservatory and the National Museum of Mexican Art, which are all free for students too. The website also includes transit and activity resources to make exploring the city even easier.

    “We are excited to see so many students finally have the opportunity to go into the city and appreciate it for how amazing and opportunity-filled it is,” said SESP junior and NU in Chicago co‑chair Shoshi Shapiro.

    This quarter, students can also participate in “Life in Chicago: Food, Conversation & Neighborhood Exploration.” Students will have the opportunity to explore specific Chicago neighborhoods with civically engaged young alumni in the city. They will visit key neighborhood sites in Lincoln Square or South Loop and learn about the neighborhood’s history and culture. Students will get also get to explore local streets and learn how alumni have integrated into their new community over dinner. This event will be held on Saturday, April 30.

    “As we look ahead to what students want from Chicago and Chicago programming, we see so many students excited to attend events like Life in Chicago, where they get to interact with alumni and ask questions about how to make the most of living in an urban environment after college, and for May CTA and museum passes, so they can take advantage of the hub of cultural institutions here in Chicago,” Shapiro said.

    Registration for “Life in Chicago” will open on Wednesday, April 20. This initiative is supported by the Center for Civic Engagement, Student Enrichment Services, Office of Campus Life and Associated Student Government.

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    NU in Chicago Helps Students “Spring into Chicago” with Free Resources and Programming

    In addition to structured events, pilot program offers free el fare and additional free museum passes to students throughout Spring Quarter

    March 28, 2016

    This Spring Quarter, Northwestern University students will have even more opportunities to explore Chicago neighborhoods and civic institutions, thanks to NU in Chicago’s “Spring into Chicago” initiative.

    NU in Chicago is a program of Northwestern’s Center for Civic Engagement that helps connect students with civic resources and experiential learning in the city of Chicago. The Spring into Chicago initiative is spearheaded by three undergraduate students who saw a need for students to engage more directly with Chicago during their time at Northwestern.

    “All students have different familiarity levels with Chicago, and I hope that this diverse set of Spring into Chicago's programming makes the city more accessible for both the Chicago native and the newcomer,” said Steffi Brock-Wilson, an NU in Chicago co-chair and Weinberg senior.

    Free L Fare and Museum Passes

    Throughout all of Spring Quarter, students will have the opportunity to check out free CTA cards every weekend. On Fridays, students can check out a card pre-loaded with 10 one-way rides. Students can share the card with other students or make multiple trips into Chicago until the card is due back the following Monday.

    Students can also check out a limited number of free museum passes to the Adler Planetarium and Chicago History Museum, designed specially for NU students throughout spring quarter. They are also encouraged to visit museums that are already free for students with a WildCARD like the Art Institute and Museum of Contemporary Art. And the program will also provide information about resources like Lincoln Park Zoo, Garfield Park Conservatory and the National Museum of Mexican Art, which are all free for students too.

    “Chicago is alive and vibrant in the springtime, so I'm looking forward to exploring places like the Garfield Park Conservatory, the Museum of Contemporary Art and local neighborhood eateries,” Brock-Wilson said. The el passes and museum passes will be available for check out from the NU in Chicago website starting at the beginning of the quarter.

    Facilitated Chicago Programs

    In addition to access to transit and admission to museums, students can also engage with the city through two scheduled programs this spring. To kick off the quarter, Northwestern English Professor and lifetime Chicagoan, Bill Savage, will lead students on a bus tour to Chicago’s south and southwest sides to explore hidden gems in the city, including the Hyde Park site of the World’s Fair hosted by Chicago in 1893, the National Museum of Mexican Art in Pilsen and former Mayor Daley’s Bridgeport home. The trip, “Beyond the Bean: History, Hot Dogs & Hidden Gems of Chicago,” will be held on Saturday, April 2 from 12:30-4:30pm.

    The second program students can participate in is “Life in Chicago: Food, Conversation & Neighborhood Exploration.” Students will have the opportunity to explore specific Chicago neighborhoods through the eyes of young civically engaged alumni in the city. They have the chance to visit key neighborhood sites, including local attractions and restaurants, while learning how alumni have integrated into their new community upon graduation. This event will be held on Saturday, April 30.

    “Northwestern students always say that they want to go into Chicago more often, and now we have not only made it easy for them to access, but also provided structured programming that acts as a great gateway to engagement,” said Shoshi Shapiro, an NU in Chicago co-chair and SESP junior.

    In an attempt to provide students with as many resources as possible and make accessing Chicago easier than ever, NU in Chicago has also compiled guides to help with travel to the city. A variety of transit and activity resources can be found on the NU in Chicago website.

    This initiative is supported by the Center for Civic Engagement, Student Enrichment Services, Office of Campus Life and Associated Student Government.

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    NU Votes Helps Students with Grace Period Registration and Early Voting through Voter Van

    March 3, 2016

    VoterVan

    Days before the Illinois primary election, students and staff from the NU Votes initiative will be providing transportation to help members of the Northwestern University community register to vote or vote early in Evanston. After successfully transporting dozens of voters last year, the “Voter Van” is back for a second year to help make voting in the primary election easier.

    “In 2016 voting is still a cumbersome and somewhat opaque process, laden with barriers that ultimately decrease participation in our political system,” said WCAS senior and NU Votes co-chair Andrea Cladek. “The Voter Van is a simple way to remove some of those logistical barriers to voting -- and in doing so, to support students in building a vibrant culture of political engagement at Northwestern.”

    NU Votes is a nonpartisan initiative of Northwestern’s Center for Civic Engagement that provides the campus community with accessible and understandable information about voter registration and voting procedures. With support from the Office of Campus Life, the Voter Van will be driven by NU Votes staff and take voters from Norris University Center to the Evanston Civic Center on Wednesday, March 9 and Thursday, March 10 from 12-4pm each day. The van will depart from the circle on the southwest side of Norris every 20 minutes.

    Those registering to vote or updating their address, must present two forms of ID, one of which shows the voter's current address. A WildCARD or out of state driver’s license can count as one form of ID, but the other form must have a current address. A lease agreement, utility bill or mail postmarked to the current address will be accepted as proof of residence.

    Registered voters who want to cast their ballots do not need to bring identification, although a WildCARD is recommended. Cook County’s card readers will work with most out-of-state licenses in addition to Illinois licenses and state IDs. Bringing this identification can speed up the check-in process.

    "A healthy democracy depends on student involvement. I encourage Northwestern students to take the time to ensure they are registered to vote at their current address and make their voices heard by voting in the upcoming Presidential Primary," said Cook County Clerk David Orr.

    The Voter Van project is spearheaded by two Center for Civic Engagement student fellows. The students decided to run the Voter Van for a second year in an attempt to reduce barriers that deter college students from voting. They determined that the distance of the Evanston Civic Center from campus could be a deterrent to casting a ballot for students who need grace period registration or want to vote early.

    “The Voter Van is an incredibly important resource for Northwestern students and faculty that expands access to voting and voting registration to all members of the Northwestern community,” said WCAS senior and NU Votes co-chair David Tyson. “There are a lot of different regulations in place which can make voter registration and voting a difficult process to navigate, but the Voter Van provides students with all the resources to navigate those processes and bypass the long lines on election day."

    The Center for Civic Engagement also offers year-round assistance with voter registration in all 50 states. Northwestern community members can stop by the CCE’s office at 1813 Hinman Ave. from 9am-5pm, Monday through Friday. The Voter Van project is also supported by Northwestern’s Office of Student Engagement and the Leadership and Community Engagement Office.

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    NU Votes Holds Voter Registration Drive to Help Students Register to Vote Before Primary Election Deadline

    February 11, 2016

    With just a few days left to register to vote for the Illinois primary election, Northwestern students have the opportunity to participate in voter registration on Friday, February 12.

    "A healthy democracy depends on student involvement. I encourage Northwestern students to take the time to ensure they are registered to vote at their current address and make their voices heard by voting in the upcoming Presidential Primary," said Cook County Clerk David Orr.

    NU Votes, a non-partisan initiative run by the Center for Civic Engagement, provides accessible and understandable tools to help students register to vote. NU Votes staff will provide voter registration materials at table four on the ground floor of Norris University Center on Friday from 11am to 3pm.

    "The voter registration process can be challenging to navigate, especially because all 50 states have different forms and procedures,” said Heidi Gross, program manager for the Center for Civic Engagement. “NU Votes hopes to demystify the process for students and make registering or updating one’s address as simple as spending five minutes at a table in Norris."

    In 2014, only 19.9 percent of young people ages 18 to 29 turned out to vote, the lowest youth turnout for a federal election ever recorded, according to the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement.

    NU Votes works to make the voter registration process easier for students by mailing in registration for students and compiling research for every state’s voter requirements. NU Votes staff can help students register at either their campus address or permanent address in any of the 50 states. NU Votes can also help people update their registration if they’ve moved since they last registered to vote.

    In order to register to vote on Friday, students should bring appropriate state identification for the state in which they want to register, or they can provide the last four digits of their social security number.

    The Illinois primary will be held on Tuesday, March 15 and the deadline to turn in voter registration, which includes online registration for Illinois voters with state identification, is Tuesday, February 16.

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    Northwestern, Evanston Team up to Provide Students Heart Safety Training

    February 9, 2016

    Northwestern University’s Center for Civic Engagement and Neighborhood and Community Relations office are teaming up on Sunday, February 14 to host an Evanston Heart Safe Community Event, focused on educating students and city residents about how to potentially save the life of someone experiencing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Evanston health care and safety providers will provide trainings from 10am to 3pm on Sunday in three campus locations. During trainings, students will learn how to identify if someone is having a heart attack, how to properly use an AED, how to perform hands-only CPR and when to call 9-1-1.

    Students can drop in for trainings or register ahead of time online. There will be an additional 12 Illinois Heart Safe Community training sites throughout Evanston. Registration is accepted here.

    Northwestern student groups are helping support the event as well. Northwestern Community Health Corps, which focuses on helping improve the health of Evanston and Skokie residents, Phi Delta Epsilon, Northwestern’s medical fraternity, and One Step Before, Northwestern’s minority pre-medical society, are all helping facilitate the trainings and inform the student body about the opportunity for heart safety education.

    St. Francis Hospital employees and Northwestern Police Department staff will lead the trainings in the following campus locations. Snacks and coffee will be provided following the trainings.
    - Norris University Center, Northwestern Room
    - University Hall, Room 218
    - Technological Institute, Room L158

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    Dozens of Students Attend NU in Chicago Event about Indigenous Peoples

    November 17, 2015

    Northwestern undergraduates, graduate students and faculty had the opportunity to learn about Chicago's indigenous community through NU in Chicago: Indigenous Peoples of Chicago day on November 15.

    The Center for Civic Engagement, in partnership with One Book One Northwestern, hosted a trip to Chicago's American Indian Center where students spent the day learning about the wide range of opinions in the Native American community about the use of indigenous names and figures as mascots. At the AIC, students participated in a presentation by the AIC’s executive director, Andrew Johnson, and ate native foods such as frybread and Indian corn soup.

    “I saw the mascot issue as incredibly important to the native community, and it spreads across multiple generations and that to me was very powerful,” said SESP junior Shoshana Shapiro, an NU in Chicago co-chair. “Seeing how, young and old, everyone is trying to make their identity matter and used appropriately was inspiring.”

    Eli Suzukovich, a post-doctoral research fellow in the Psychology department who works with both the AIC and Evanston’s Mitchell Museum led a tour outside the AIC in Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood. He talked about ecological history around the Center and Chicago’s relationship with the indigenous community.

    "The NU in Chicago day exposed me to a new perspective of a culture and history that I had only a basic understanding about," said Weinberg senior David Tyson, an NU in Chicago co-chair. "It was also great to hear from advocacy groups and explore the different arguments to a very openly-debated issue."

    After visiting the AIC, students returned to campus for a discussion about cultural appropriation with Chi-Nations Youth Council, a Native American youth and advocacy group. Students from the Native American and Indigenous Student Association and faculty representatives from One Book One Northwestern helped facilitate the event.

    Read The Daily Northwestern story for more about the event.

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    NU Students Focus on Indigenous Peoples of Chicago

    November 4, 2015

    Dozens of students will have the opportunity to learn about Chicago’s indigenous community through a day of exploration and discussion.

    The Center for Civic Engagement and One Book One Northwestern are hosting an NU in Chicago: Indigenous Peoples of Chicago Day on Sunday, November 15 from 12:15-4:30pm. The day will include a guided tour of the American Indian Center and a lunch featuring native foods. Students will also receive a guided tour of the surrounding neighborhood and participate in a discussion on the use of indigenous names and peoples as athletic mascots facilitated by Chi-Nations Youth Council, a Native American youth and advocacy group.

    “I am looking forward to this day because it is a chance to think about the indigenous community in Chicago,” said WCAS senior Steffi Brock-Wilson, an NU in Chicago co-chair. “I have attended great conversations about the history of Native Americans in relation to this university, but I am looking forward to November 15 to hear from the American Indian Center and Chi-Nations about the successes and challenges within the indigenous community in Chicago today."

    This NU in Chicago event will be led by Eli Suzukovich, a post-doctoral research fellow in the Psychology department who works with both the AIC and Evanston’s Mitchell Museum. Student leaders from Native American and Indigenous Student Association and One Book One Northwestern will also join the event.

    This event is free for Northwestern students including transportation, a late lunch, and admission fees.

    Students can register at www.NUinChicago.org. For more information about this event, contact Heidi Gross or visit the NU in Chicago website.

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    NU in Chicago Helps Connect Students to the Chicago Humanities Festivalʼs Northwestern Day

    October 26, 2015

    In an effort to continue connecting Northwestern University students with engaged learning opportunities around the Chicago-area, NU’s Center for Civic Engagement and the Chicago Humanities Festival (CHF) have partnered to send NU students to CHF’s fifth annual Morris and Dolores Kohl Kaplan Northwestern Day.

    “Chicago Humanities Festival events are great opportunities to be around really smart, engaged people talking about interesting, important things,” said Ian Blechschmidt, a graduate assistant for the Center for Civic Engagement and former CHF fellow. “It’s a thrill to help connect Northwestern students with such a cool institution.”

    CHF’s Morris and Dolores Kohl Kaplan Northwestern Day is a day of public lectures and performances taking place on Saturday, October 24 on Northwestern’s Evanston campus. The day is part of CHF’s 2015 fall festival, focused this year on the theme “Citizens.” The Center for Civic Engagement’s NU in Chicago program worked with CHF to send a number of Northwestern students to three of that day’s programs.

    Some students will attend Fixing the Republic, which features Lawrence Lessig, an activist, law professor and presidential candidate. Some will check out philosopher, professor of bio-ethics and author Peter Singer, who will talk about his recent book, The Most Good You Can Do. And others will hear writer, journalist and 2015 MacArthur "Genius" grant awardee Ta-Nehisi Coates discuss his recent work, Between the World and Me. Eric R. Brown, a School of Education and Social Policy doctoral student, and Blechschmidt, a School of Communication doctoral student, will also lead a follow-up discussion about Coates’ talk for NU in Chicago students at the Center for Civic Engagement. Tickets for the events were made available to Northwestern students on the NU in Chicago website on a first come first served basis starting earlier this week and sold out almost immediately.

    The Chicago Humanities Festival is one of Chicago’s premier resources for exploring and enjoying the humanities year-round. NU in Chicago is an initiative administered by the Center for Civic Engagement to provide students with periodic opportunities to engage with Chicago-area neighborhoods and community resources, facilitated by Northwestern faculty, alumni, and community experts. NU in Chicago plans to continue connecting students with unique Chicago-themed programs like the Chicago Humanities Festival in coming years.

    The Chicago Humanities Festivals’ Morris & Dolores Kohl Kaplan Northwestern Day is co-presented by the Chicago Humanities Festival and Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, with the support of Northwestern’s Office of the President, Office of the Provost, and Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences.

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    Engage Chicago Hosts Record Number of Participants for Summer 2015

    September 23, 2015

    Northwestern University’s Engage Chicago finished its most recent session on August 15, marking six summers since the program began in 2010. This summer, the program reached a significant milestone in terms of participation. A record-breaking 53 students enrolled, representing 13 universities and eight countries.

    Hosted by NU’s Center for Civic Engagement, the eight-week program revolves around six core components: a part-time internship with a public sector organization; an urban studies course; weekly field experiences; seminars and reflection; career-specific concentrations; and a vibrant community of peers living in Chicago.

    “What pays off most about this program is students are fully immersed in the city,” said Ruth Martin, an Engage Chicago instructor. “Students use the city as kind of a laboratory.”

    Through weekly field experiences and individual exploration, students travel through Chicago’s neighborhoods, meeting with organizations and community leaders involved in social change. These visits are closely tied to the core academic class -- an urban studies course taught by SESP Professor Jody Kretzmann. This relationship between classroom and community-based learning provides a unique opportunity for students to think through theory in a real-life context.

    In addition to the significant increase in student participants, the program also grew in the number of concentrations offered, which doubled from two to four.

    A new community organizing concentration, led by activist Mariame Kaba, welcomed seven students into its inaugural cohort. SESP junior Matt Herndon, who interned at LIFT Chicago, said studying the concentration gave him more confidence to pursue community organizing in the future.

    “We were able to grow so much and think critically because it was a small group. It was a very good learning experience,“ Herndon said. “Meeting with young people doing amazing things across Chicago and going to protests with friends in the program was amazing.”

    Other concentrations included health and medicine, law and advocacy, and direct service. Each concentration allowed for career exploration and networking, with health and medicine students visiting community health clinics and direct service students volunteering with local nonprofits.

    SoC junior Ryan Martin participated in the law and advocacy concentration, which critically examined the legal field. Experiences included meeting with a public defender and state’s attorney at the 26th and California courthouse and touring a Chicago police station.

    “The best thing was all the different attorneys we got to meet … and to see how they are using their degrees to make the world a better place,” Martin said.

    The program is open to undergraduate students from any college or university who have completed their freshman year. Students can apply here for the 2016 program.

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    Northwestern Celebrates Constitution Day

    September 1, 2015

    On Thursday, September 17th, universities across the country will recognize Constitution Day. Established in 2004 under the leadership of late Senator Robert Byrd, this federal observance recognizes the ratification of the U.S. Constitution, which took place at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787.

    To commemorate the event, the Center for Legal Studies is hosting scholar Amanda Hollis-Brusky for a talk entitled “Black-Robed Policymakers or Defenders of the Constitution?: When the Supreme Court Should and Should Not Govern Us.” The event will be held from 5:30-7pm on October 1 in Annenberg Hall, G15. It is free and open to the public.

    Additional resources regarding Consitution Day are available through the Center for Civic Engagement. Click here for access to articles, free videos, quizzes, and other information about the U.S. Constitution.

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    Public Interest Program Places 13 Graduates at Chicago Area Non-Profits

    August 31, 2015

    The Center for Civic Engagement is proud to announce the placement of 13 recent Northwestern graduates at fellowship sites through the Public Interest Program. The Public Interest Program is a one-year fellowship that connects recent graduates with a desire to make social change to paid public interest work.

    For the 2015-2016 year, fellows will work at a variety of organizations throughout Evanston and Chicago, addressing issues related to education, healthcare, urban planning, and more.

    Fellows have been placed at the following host organizations:

  • Emily Allen - Chicago Public Schools REACH
  • Emily Callahan - Chapin Hall
  • Amina Dreessen - Chicago Public Schools
  • Alexis Gable - Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning
  • Amy Glazier-Torgerson - Northwestern University Institute for Policy Research
  • Alexandria Johnson - Northwestern University Center for Civic Engagement
  • Thidar Khine - Coalition to Save Our Mental Health Centers
  • Sunjay Kumar - SAGA Innovations
  • Nedra Lucas - Chicago Public Schools
  • Lucero Segundo - Evanston Township High School
  • Haley Sonenthal - Civic Consulting Alliance
  • Leah Varjacques - Free Spirit Media
  • Emily Wills - SAGA Innovations
  • In addition to placements with host organizations, fellows will begin participating in thrice-monthly seminars that explore public interest topics and professional development. These seminars are hosted in conjunction with other fellows from the University of Chicago and Princeton University. Between the three programs, there are nearly 50 fellows working in the Chicagoland area this year.

    To learn more about the Public Interest Program, visit the website.

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    CCE Seeking 2015-16 Grad Assistants to Promote Engaged Scholarship and Teaching

    April 28, 2015

    The Center for Civic Engagement is now accepting applications for two Graduate Assistants. The positions offer a full TGS stipend and an opportunity to learn the ins and outs of campus-based social justice programming. G.A.s will work with staff, faculty, and community partners to support current initiatives and develop new ones.

    This year's graduate offerings included an engagement-themed TGS Night Out at the Chicago History Museum, a Social Justice History Tour of Chicago, and two quarters of the for-credit course in civic engagement, G.E.O. G.A.s worked with campus partners like the Civically Engaged Grads, Chicago Field Studies, and The Graduate School, and formed new relationships with the MLK Fair Housing Exhibit and The Scholars Strategy Network.

    Applications are due 9am on May 4. A complete job posting and application is available here.

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    Civic Engagement Fellow Wins Truman Scholarship

    April 22, 2015

    Quiddist Hammerly

    Center for Civic Engagement fellow Qiddist Hammerly is a recipient of the prestigious Harry S. Truman Scholarship, the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation announced last week.

    Fifty-eight Truman Scholars were selected from a pool of 688 candidates based on their “academic success and leadership accomplishments, as well as their likelihood of becoming public service leaders,” according to a press release.

    Qiddist, a School of Education and Social Policy junior, has been integral to much of the Center’s programming this year. In the fall, Qiddist was one of the NU Votes coordinators. The program helped 800 new students register to vote across 44 states and Washington, D.C.

    During winter quarter, she helped organized a discussion on labor and justice co-sponsored by the Center and Northwestern’s Center for the Writing Arts with author Tom Geoghan, CCE director and Human Development & Social Policy professor Dan Lewis, author and Medill lecturer Alex Kotlowitz, and author and Director of the Center for the Writing Arts Reg Gibbons.

    This spring Qiddist is a Northwestern liaison for the Evanston YWCA’s Stand Against Racism initiative. She was one of the organizers of the Center’s Mayoral Runoff 101 event, a panel discussion on Chicago’s runoff election.

    Read the official Northwestern press release here.

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    Alex Johnson, CCE Employee, Named Work-Study Student Employee of the Year

    April 16, 2015

    Alex Johnson

    The Northwestern University Work-Study Office recently named Alexandria Johnson Work-Study Student Employee of the Year. Alex, a Medill senior enrolled in the Accelerated Master’s Program, has worked at the Center for four years.

    As the Center’s Work-Study student, Alex has contributed to countless programs, notably coordinating logistics for large-scale events like NU in Chicago and Engage Chicago. Her reliability, attention to detail, and incredible work ethic have made her a valued member of the team.

    “I have been fortunate enough to work with many outstanding students over the years,” said Heidi Gross, program manager, “but Alex Johnson stands out as one of the most gracious, hardworking, and thoughtful students I have ever had the pleasure of working with.”

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    Engage Chicago Announces New Concentration in Community Organizing

    March 16, 2015

    Engage Chicago — Northwestern University's popular summer field study program that allows undergraduates to earn course credit while living, working and serving together in Chicago — is excited to announce a new optional track for students interested in community organizing and issues of social justice.

    Students will gain both theoretical and practical experience through a curriculum that introduces them to a variety of community organizing work, focusing on the efforts of young people of color. Chicago-based efforts such as We Charge Genocide, Black Youth Project, Chicago Light Brigade, and the movement for reparations for police torture will be explored. Students will also examine these issues through a national lens, including studying recent protests in Ferguson, Missouri, and other parts of the country.

    Mariame Kaba, a Chicago-based activist, will lead the concentration along with Engage Chicago staff. Ms. Kaba is the founder and director of Project NIA, a grassroots organization with a vision to end youth incarceration. Prior to her work with Project NIA, Kaba served as a program officer with the Steans Family Foundation. She also works extensively with the Chicago Freedom School, the Chicago Taskforce on Violence against Girls and Young Women, and the Chicago Torture Justice Memorials Project.

    The Community Organizing Concentration is an optional addition to Engage Chicago’s eight-week curriculum, which runs from June 19 through August 14. Interested students can apply to the concentration by answering an additional question in the general Engage Chicago application, due April 6. Please direct any questions to Heidi Gross, EC Coordinator. For more information about the program, visit our website.

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    Graduate Students Explore Chicago through Social Justice History Tour

    February 26, 2015

    Northwestern University graduate students explored the long history of social justice in Chicago through a daylong tour on Saturday, February 21. Guided by Northwestern professor Dan Lewis and other community leaders, the students explored Martin Luther King’s involvement with the Chicago Freedom Movement of the late 1960s, during which he fought against redlining and other discriminatory housing practices. The event concluded with the Winter Quarter TGS Night Out at the Chicago History Museum, where students were able to enjoy after-hours access to exhibits while considering the intersection between academia and the public sphere.

    Click here to read more about the Social Justice History Tour and other events focused on Dr. King's time in Chicago.

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    Engage Chicago Alumni to Speak at Several Upcoming Information Sessions

    January 8, 2015

    The Center for Civic Engagement will host a series of information sessions throughout winter quarter for its Engage Chicago summer program.

    Engage Chicago is an eight-week program that allows undergraduate students from across the country a chance to live, work, serve and learn together in Chicago. The program is sponsored by the Center for Civic Engagement and Chicago Field Studies, both located at 1813 Hinman Avenue.

    As part of the program, participants take a class taught by NU faculty and are given placements at top community organizations around the city, in an effort to form powerful community experiences throughout the eight weeks.

    Students in any major are encouraged to apply. Engage Chicago also offers two optional concentrations for students interested in either health and medicine or law and advocacy.

    Find the full schedule for winter quarter info sessions below. Refreshments will be served.

  • January 14, 5 p.m. in Annenberg G29
  • January 20, 5 p.m. (emphasis on health concentration) at 1940 Sheridan Road
  • January 21, 5 p.m. (emphasis on law concentration) in Harris L06
  • February 3, 4 p.m. at Norris Arch Room
  • February 18, 6 p.m. in Elder Room 30
  • March 11, 4 p.m. at Norris Arch Room
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    CCE to Bring Public Interest Fellows to Campus for Information Sessions

    January 8, 2015

    CCE will be hosting three information sessions this month to discuss the Northwestern University Public Interest Program, a yearlong fellowship that helps train a new generation of leaders for social change through paid public interest work, professional development seminars and mentorship opportunities with Northwestern alumni.

    Current NUPIP Fellow Ann Bruton (SESP ’14) will talk about her experience working with the Civic Consulting Alliance, a public-private partnership that aims to improve and reshape how the city of Chicago works, on Monday, January 12 at 5pm in Parkes Hall Room 213. The event is co-sponsored by the Civic Consulting Alliance and includes an opportunity to meet and connect with current CCA employees, including Ms. Bruton. Pizza and beverages will be served.

    On Thursday, January 15, Northwestern students will have the opportunity to hear from current NUPIP Fellows Chelsea Corbin (Medill ’14) and Marisa Prasse (WCAS ’14) in the Alumni Room in Norris University Center. Ms. Corbin works at Free Spirit Media, an organization that provides more than 500 underserved Chicago youth access to and education in media production every year. Ms. Prasse is a NUPIP Fellow at the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, the official regional planning organization for seven northeastern Illinois counties.

    NUPIP Fellow Diana Balitaan (SESP ’14) will share her experiences at Evanston Township High School on Wednesday, January 15 in Norris University Center’s Scholars Room. Former Fellow Karin Scott (WCAS ’13) will also be speaking about her time working with the nonprofit organization Allowance for Good from 2013-2014. Allowance for Good is an Evanston-based organization that brings together American youth to develop the next generations of philanthropic leaders.

    For more information, visit the NUPIP website. Please contact CCE Program Manager Heidi Gross at heidi-gross@northwestern.edu with any additional questions.

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    New Article by Professor Dan A. Lewis Explores Civic and Political Engagement among Undergraduate Students

    December 9, 2014

    CCE Director and Professor of Human Development and Social Policy Dan A. Lewis co-authored a recent article that examines civic and political engagement among undergraduate students. Through a survey of nearly 700 incoming freshmen, the authors found that high school civic learning is a significant predictor of civic and political engagement. More broadly, the study suggests "that citizenship norms among young adults may be shifting to new forums of engagement rather than simply eroding, as some current literature suggests."

    Click here to read more about the article.

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    CCE and the Asset-Based Community Development Institute Join Forces to Promote Engagement

    November 11, 2014

    The Center for Civic Engagement and the Asset-Based Community Development Institute have joined together to create an innovative opportunity, redefining how students and faculty collaborate around community development. Prior to the partnership, the Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) Institute was affiliated with the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University.

    Founded in 1995 by School of Communication professor emeritus John L. McKnight and SESP professor John “Jody” Kretzmann, the ABCD Institute was first seen as an alternative to the traditional approach to solving urban problems. Rather than focusing on community deficits, as was the norm, Kretzmann and McKnight assessed communities in terms of assets, an intentionally broad term encompassing everything from a community’s physical infrastructure to its history and culture. By joining forces, ABCD and CCE create a powerful set of connections between Northwestern and those working to improve communities all over the world.

    McKnight and Kretzmann, along with a faculty of 50 highly skilled practitioners, have worked as consultants, workshop leaders, and speakers for a number of diverse constituencies, including Chicago Public Schools and the Greater Rochester Health Foundation. In 2013, with support from the Kettering Foundation, Kretzmann and McKnight expanded their work to include a greater emphasis on international community development.

    The ABCD Institute joins CCE at an exciting time, supporting the Center in its efforts to enhance the academic experiences of both students and faculty. Center director and SESP professor Dan A. Lewis is looking forward to the new opportunities presented by the partnership, particularly for students interested in community development work.

    “Jody and John bring a positive vision and a lifetime of knowledge about communities and how to build them from the ground up. CCE could not be more excited about our collaboration and the opportunities that will be provided for faculty and students.”

    For more information about the ABCD Institute, visit www.engage.northwestern.edu/abcd.

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    NU Votes Collaborates with CCE and CSI to Mobilize Voters with Voter Van

    October 31, 2014

    As the midterm election nears, NU Votes is working with the Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) and the Center for Student Involvement (CSI) to provide transportation to Evanston’s same-day voter registration location.

    The vehicle, driven by NU Votes students and informally called the “Voter Van,” will leave the Norris University Center (1999 Campus Drive) every 20 minutes and take students to the polls at Evanston Civic Center (2100 Ridge Avenue), where same-day voter registration is available.  For students who are already registered, the Voter Van can also drop them at the polls at Parkes Hall or Patten Gymnasium, as needed. 

    This is the first year that Illinois is offering same-day registration, creating a new opportunity for students who either did not register or are registered in their home state but did not acquire an absentee ballot. As Evanston residents, all otherwise-eligible students have the right to register and vote in Illinois if they so choose.

    The van will operate continuously from 10 a.m. through 7 p.m., picking up and dropping off students at the turnaround in front of Norris roughly every 20 minutes (e.g. 10am, 10:20, 10:40, etc.).  Students planning to utilize same day registration must bring two valid forms of identification, one of which must show their current Evanston address (students already successfully registered do not need ID, though it is recommended that they bring a WildCARD in case they run into any obstacles at the poll). A lease agreement, utility bill, or mail postmarked to the current address will be accepted as proof of residence. Additional forms of ID include driver’s licenses, WildCARDs, and credit cards.

    The idea for the Voter Van originated at an NU Votes meeting during which students discussed the barriers college students face when trying to vote. While same-day registration will allow many previously ineligible students to cast a ballot, some thought that the Civic Center’s distance from campus might be a deterrent.

    “We’re very excited about the doors opened by same-day voter registration,” said Larry Svabek, Weinberg senior and NU Votes co-coordinator. “But the Civic Center can be a far walk, and we realized that a lot of students don’t even know where it is.”

    The Voting Van is one of several attempts by NU Votes to encourage political participation. The group is also working with university departments to send campus-wide emails and running a social media campaign in an effort to get out the vote this November.

    For more information about Election Day registration, please visit the Cook County Clerk’s website. Questions concerning the NU Voter Van can be directed to the Center for Civic Engagement at engage@northwestern.edu.

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    "Writing for Social Change" Course Returns for Winter Quarter 2015

    October 28, 2014

    The Center for the Writing Arts, in partnership with the Center for Civic Engagement, is again offering its course titled “The Art of Nonfiction: Exploring Writing for Social Change” during Winter Quarter 2015. This course is designed for students with recent experience in community engagement; students interested in writing who wish to explore issues of civic engagement are also encouraged to apply.

    During this course, students will both read examples of writing intended for social change and also produce and edit their own writing. Students will work together to explore the ways that writing can be used to reflect imaginatively on personal experience as well as to inform, persuade, and engage readers. Students will also have the opportunity to develop plans for a sustained writing project based on individual interests and goals.

    Students interested in enrolling in this course should complete a brief application posted on the CCE website no later than Monday, November 3rd. More information, as well as the application, can be found at www.engage.northwestern.edu/writing.

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    NU in Chicago Brings Nearly 300 Students into the City

    October 9, 2014

    On September 28th, 2014, nearly 300 Northwestern undergraduates explored Chicago’s neighborhoods through the Center for Civic Engagement’s fall NU in Chicago event.  Now in its third year, NU in Chicago’s interactive excursions give students the opportunity to explore various Chicago neighborhoods and civic resources. For this fall event, students were able to choose one of six themed tracks: Global Neighborhoods, Sustainability, Chicago History, Arts in Chicago, Public Spaces, and Chicago Pride. Each track was facilitated by a Northwestern faculty member, community leader, or alum with expertise in the given subject, including School of Communication professor emeritus Paul Arntson and Chinese language professor Licheng Gu.

    While many students were familiar with the city’s most popular destinations before the event, the specialized themes allowed freshmen and upperclassmen alike to visit parts of Chicago that often go unexplored. Students on the Arts in Chicago trip, for example, were given the opportunity to see a new exhibit at the School of the Art Institute, led by curator Kate Zeller (WCAS ‘02). Similarly, the Chicago History group discussed politics with Cook County Clerk David Orr, while the Environment and Urban Agriculture track stopped at the historic Union Stockyard Gate, the backdrop for Upton Sinclair’s 1906 novel The Jungle. Other highlights included the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum, the Chicago History Museum, and the Center on Halsted.

    The success of the fall event demonstrates students’ desire to better connect with Chicago. “Hopefully this is a Northwestern tradition that will continue for years to come, and one that will inspire students to break out of the Northwestern ‘bubble’ and get down into the neighborhoods of Chicago to learn and explore,” said McCormick senior Alex Van Atta, who helped organize the event. Recognizing this emerging way of thinking, CCE will continue to sponsor recurring NU in Chicago events throughout the year to promote engaged learning and bridge the gap between students and the city. The next event is planned for winter quarter and will focus more specifically on a single theme while still including multiple tracks as options for students.

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    NU Votes Nearly Triples Voter Registration Rate for Eligible Incoming Students

    October 6, 2014

    For the past four years, NU Votes, a voter registration initiative run by student leaders through the Center for Civic Engagement, in collaboration with the WildCARD office and the Division of Student Affairs, has provided incoming freshmen with the voter registration materials and assistance necessary to register students to vote at their campus or permanent address.

    This year, NU Votes restructured the program in partnership with the Office of New Student and Family Programs, integrating voter registration into procedures at each of the six Wildcat Welcome Centers in residence halls across campus during Wildcat Welcome. 

    With the help of the Center for Civic Engagement’s Fellows and around 20 student volunteers from across campus, NU Votes registered nearly 800 incoming students to vote in 44 different states and the District of Columbia while checking IDs and distributing WildCARDs at Welcome Centers this year.

    That number represents over 80% of the eligible, unregistered voters who passed through the line, who took advantage of the opportunity to register. All told, adding in the 29% of students who reported being registered to vote already, nearly 90% of the eligible incoming students who passed through the Welcome Center lines are now successfully registered at either their campus or permanent address.

    NU Votes continues to offer ongoing voter registration and information at the Center for Civic Engagement (1813 Hinman Avenue) and looks forward to supporting additional voter education and participation initiatives on campus throughout the coming year. 

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    NU in Chicago Registration Now Open

    Registration is now live for Neighborhood Exploration Day, the Center for Civic Engagement’s fall NU in Chicago initiative. The event is scheduled for Sunday, September 28. Now entering its third year, the program continues to offer experiential learning opportunities to students across Northwestern’s six undergraduate colleges.

    Students have the option to sign up for one of six tracks, each focusing on a unique aspect of life in Chicago. The separate tracks are led by a combination of Northwestern faculty, alumni, and prominent community leaders, including history professor Keith Woodhouse and Weinberg alumna Kate Zeller.

    With a wide variety of themes, each trip promises to expose students to lesser- known parts of the city. The Environment and Urban Agriculture track, for example, plans to visit the “Greenest Street in America,” while the Chicago Pride track will hear from staff members at the Center on Halsted. Transportation, admission, and refreshments are all included.

    Through quarterly events like this one, NU in Chicago works to bridge the gap between students and the many resources the city has to offer. This event in particular, organized in collaboration with the Office of New Student and Family Programs, is designed to make engagement with the city part of the Northwestern experience from the start for the Class of 2018.

    To learn more about the trip and to register for the event, visit www.nuinchicago.org.

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    Northwestern Celebrates Constitution Day

    On Wednesday, September 17th, universities across the country will recognize Constitution Day. Established in 2004 under the leadership of late Senator Robert Byrd, this federal observance recognizes the ratification of the U.S. Constitution, which took place at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787. 

    This year, a special focus will be placed on the signing of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, according to the National Constitution Center. Join us in celebrating by exploring the various resources available online at www.engage.northwestern.edu/constitution. The page includes links to websites commemorating the holiday, articles, free videos, quizzes, and other information about the U.S. Constitution.

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    CCE Launches NU in Chicago Program

    NU in Chicago

    The Center for Civic Engagement's newest initiative, a collaborative campus-wide effort to better connect Northwestern students to Chicago-area civic resources through engaging and interactive learning experiences, will launch this Saturday, March 1, from 1-5:30pm. NU in Chicago will offer free, themed trips to Chicago to give NU behind-the-scenes access to unique pieces of Chicago's culture, resources, and life.

    The first trip, "Exploring Great Chicago Institutions," will introduce students to several key Chicago institutions in order to learn about how museums can be hubs for generating knowledge, educating citizens, and building stronger communities. Students will be able to select one of three tracks: sustainability & conservation, Chicago history & culture, and experiencing art. All three tracks will be facilitated by NU faculty or alumni who are experts in their fields. Transportation and admission are provided, and participants are invited to attend an optional, informal reception on campus after the event.

    Space is limited; click here for more information and to register today!

    On a recurring basis, the CCE will craft excursions that explore Chicago by tapping into the network of Northwestern alumni planted in a variety of fields and institutions in the city. Next fall, a kick-off event open to the student body will engage hundreds of Wildcats in a day of immersive, guided exploration of a wide variety of neighborhoods and institutions throughout the city.

    Read The Daily Northwestern's piece on NU in Chicago.

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    CCE Partners with SESP to Offer Popular Philanthropy Course

    In Spring 2014, Northwestern's School of Education and Social Policy is offering for the second time a great course on the study and practice of philanthropic giving. The course, entitled "Learning Philanthropy: Engaging in the Study and Practice of Giving," will examine the role of philanthropy in the United States by studying its history, social meanings, motivations, and effects. And, with the support of a national foundation, the course will empower students to make a substantial financial gift to an organization of the class's choosing at the end of the quarter.

    Students enrolled in the course will have the opportunity to give away $50,000 to the cause of their choice. This course is open to any undergraduate student interested in civic engagement and the public good. However, space is limited, so students will be admitted based on an application process.

    “Learning Philanthropy” (SESP 351) will be held on Tuesdays from 2-5PM during Spring Quarter. Dean Peterson (SESP) and Lauren Jones Young (Program Director Emerita, the Spencer Foundation) will co-facilitate the course.


    Students interested in enrolling in this course should complete a brief application no later than Monday, February 10th. Questions should be directed to to Dean Peterson at p-peterson@northwestern.edu.



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    Former CCE Fellow Receives Prestigious Award

    Northwestern alum (WCAS '13) and former Center for Civic Engagement Fellow Chelsea Glenn has been awarded a prestigious Marshall Scholarship.

    Glenn has been selected to attend the University of Oxford and the University of Sussex where she will study economic and global development. These scholarships allow American students the opportunity to continue their studies abroad at a British university for two years in recognition of academic success and leadership abilities.

    Glenn served as a Center for Civic Engagement undergraduate Fellow during her junior and senior years at NU. As a Fellow, she developed the Civically Engaged Alumni Roundtables event, facilitating networking and learning from civically engaged NU alumni working in various fields. She supported civically engaged student groups and developed a strategy to engage NU alumni who are committed to civic engagement.

    As cited in a Northwestern press release, Glenn’s involvement around the world with a variety of global engagement activities contributed to her achievement of this award.

    “I expect that Chelsea will make a significant contribution in the field of international development,” said Brian Hanson, director of Northwestern’s Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies. “She is truly passionate about human justice and the need for social change.”

    You can read the full announcement on Glenn’s receipt of the Marshall Scholars Award here.

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    CCE's Work Featured by NU's Office of Alumni Relations & Development

    The Center for Civic Engagement's work was recently featured in a piece by Northwestern University's Office of Alumni Relations that highlights the impact alumni and supporters have on Northwestern students' education. The article, which points to CCE as a driving force for engagement on campus, states that "community involvement has never been more central to the University’s mission."

    To read the article, click here.

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    Engage NU: A Progress Report on Northwestern University's Center for Civic Engagement


    As the Center for Civic Engagement moves into our fifth year of operation, it is essential to review the progress we have made as we strive to make Northwestern the best university in the country for public service and engaged teaching, learning, and research. You can download and read our report here.

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    Popular "Writing for Social Change" Course Returns for Winter Quarter 2014

    In Winter Quarter 2014, the Center for the Writing Arts in partnership with the Center for Civic Engagement is offering a course titled “The Art of Nonfiction: Exploring Writing for Social Change.” This course is designed for students with recent experience in community engagement; students interested in writing who wish to explore issues of civic engagement are also encouraged to apply.

    During this course, students will both read examples of writing intended for social change and also produce and edit their own writing. Students will work together to explore the ways that writing can be used to reflect imaginatively on personal experience as well as to inform, persuade, and engage readers. Students will also have the opportunity to develop plans for a sustained writing project based on individual interests and goals.

    Students interested in enrolling in this course should complete a brief application posted on the CCE website no later than Friday, November 1st. More information, as well as the application, can be found at www.engage.northwestern.edu/writing.

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    NU Votes Doubles Voter Registration for Class of 2017

    For the past three years, NU Votes, a voter registration initiative headed by the Center for Civic Engagement, has partnered with the Wildcard Office to provide voter registration materials and assistance to all incoming freshmen to register either on campus or at their permanent address in any of the 50 states.

    With a staff of 17 trained student volunteers, NU Votes registered 593 students during Wildcat Welcome Week 2013. Of the participating freshman class, the percentage of registered students increased from 44% to 88% as a result of the efforts of the NU Votes team. Integrating voter registration into essential processes such as student ID distribution sends an important message to the entire Northwestern community that civic engagement is a valued part of NU's culture.

     

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    NU Celebrates Constitution Day: September 17, 2013

    redesignedsiteIn 2004, Congress, led by late Senator Robert Byrd, passed an amendment as part of the Omnibus spending bill, which recognizes September 17 as Constitution Day. This day of special recognition honors the ratification of the U.S. Constitution, which took place at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787. On Tuesday, September 17 universities across the country, including Northwestern, will recognize Constitution Day.

    Join us in celebrating this day by exploring the various resources available online at www.engage.northwestern.edu/constitution. The page includes links to websites commemorating the holiday, articles, free videos, quizzes and other information about the U.S. Constitution.

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    Harvard Sociologist Dr. Robert Sampson to Visit Northwestern

    On May 17th The Center for Civic Engagement is pleased to bring you two great events featuring Robert Sampson, Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences at Harvard University. For more information on Dr. Sampson's lecture & panel discussion, please visit the event webpage.

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    Civically Engaged Alumni Roundtables

    On April 23, the Center for Civic Engagement, the Northwestern Alumni Association, The Graduate School, and University Career Services hosted the third annual Civically Engaged Alumni Roundtables, a student-alumni networking event focused on ways to build meaningful lives and successful careers. The event featured 22 alumni committed to serving the public good in a wide variety of fields, including arts and culture, business and management, education and youth, environmental sustainability, health and medicine, and media and communications.

    Civically Engaged Alumni Roundtables centered on thematically-clustered discussions between alumni and students, addressing a diverse range of issues including racially divided educational inequality in Chicago; the powerful role that the private sector can play in promoting positive, sustainable change; and the way green technology can revolutionize American industry.

    The event concluded with a reception, allowing students to informally network with alumni.

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    STEM and Community Engagement: Connecting Research and Society

    CCE sponsored a moderated panel discussion about the different models of community engagement within STEM fields. Faculty and practitioners discussed how to connect scientific research to the broader world and communities that surround us through scientific public policy, citizen science initiatives, and science education. For more information, visit the STEM Engagement Workshop webpage.

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    Chicago’s Immigrant Communities

    On Thursday, February 6, One Book One Northwestern hosted a dinner book talk on Chicago’s Immigrant Communities, featuring Medill Professor Jack Doppelt and highlighting the chapter “GT’s Diner” from Alex Kotlowitz’ book Never A City So Real. It brought together students, professors, staff, and Evanston community members to discuss issues of immigration and the ever-evolving ethnic and racial landscape of Chicago.

    Doppelt and his team of students work on documenting immigrants’ stories as part of a project founded by Doppelt, Immigrant Connect. His presentation was peppered by stories of immigrant successes as well as the ongoing challenges and failures of the US immigration system. The event concluded with rich discussion on the chapter “GT’s Diner,” that highlights the difficulties faced by immigrant day laborers in Chicago.

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    Al Capone to the Latin Kings: Violent Crime in Chicago

    On Monday, January 14, One Book One Northwestern hosted a dinner book talk on crime and justice in Chicago, featuring Leigh Bienen, Senior NU Law School Lecturer, and highlighting the chapters “26th Street” and “Inside Out” from Alex Kotlowitz’ book Never a City So Real.  Students, professors, staff, and Evanston and Chicago community members gathered to discuss issues of violence, gangs, and the criminal justice system in Chicago.

    Bienen, a criminal defense attorney in Chicago, helped bring to life the book with stories from her experiences litigating there, the obstacles she faced, and the clients she served. Her talk was followed by lively discussion about root causes of organized crime in Chicago, gang culture, and innovative grassroots efforts—such as Cure Violence (formerly CeaseFire)—that are used to counter the problem of violence.

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    Rahm Emanuel Speaks at Northwestern

    On November 28th, 2012, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel gave a talk at Northwestern University on Chicago and its political culture through One Book One Northwestern. Professor Dan Lewis, Director of the Center for Civic Engagement, facilitated an on-stage Q&A with Mayor Emanuel following his lecture. This year, the Center for Civic Engagement played a crucial role in sponsoring the One Book selection, Never a City So Real by Alex Kotlowitz. Never a City So Real has encouraged increased student engagement with the city through events like NU in Chicago and speaker showcases like Chicago’s Mayor that cultivate students’ richer understanding of Chicago.

    You can read more about Emanuel’s visit or watch his conversation with Dr. Lewis here.

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    Professor Lewis Receives TGS Award

    Dr. Dan Lewis, the director of the Center for Civic Engagement, was awarded the Faculty Award for Engagement on November 8th, 2012 as part of the Graduate School’s inaugural Awards and Recognition Dinner. Professor Lewis was recognized for his contributions to graduate student community engagement, which marks one of the major initiatives of the Graduate School’s upcoming strategic plan. Through his work at the Center for Civic Engagement, Professor Lewis has spearheaded the development of new programs aimed specifically at graduate students to provide them with additional opportunities to enhance their academic coursework through community involvement.

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    CCE’s UVote Project Featured in NY Times

    The Center for Civic Engagement’s UVote project was highlighted in the New York Times on October 14, 2012. Here at Northwestern the NU Votes team successfully registered almost 95% of eligible Northwestern freshmen with an extensive, campus-wide voter registration drive. NU Votes’ efforts were replicated at 9 other universities across the United States through the UVote project. By helping students navigate the voter registration process, the Center for Civic Engagement is fostering a wider spirit of nonpartisan political and civic involvement on college campuses.

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    Chicago Immersion Day for NU Students, Faculty

    On September 30th, 2012, the Center for Civic Engagement sponsored NU in Chicago, an opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to explore one of the many diverse neighborhoods of Chicago, in conjunction with One Book One Northwestern. Communities featured in this year’s One Book selection, Never a City So Real, inspired the large-scale event. NU in Chicago provided more than 300 students with cultural immersion and engaged learning experiences in 10 different neighborhoods, all of which were led by an experienced Northwestern faculty member.

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    CCE Staff Research Featured in Higher Education Exchange

    (posted 1/9/13)

    The Center for Civic Engagement’s own Dr. Dan Lewis & Dr. Ellen Knutson collaborated on a recent Higher Education Exchange article for the 2012 publication. Titled “Civic Engagement and Doctoral Education,” the piece discusses the model & goals of the Center for Civic Engagement and its Graduate Engagement Opportunities (GEO) program.
    Say the authors, “We would like to see programming that prepares students to fill positions outside the academy and, equally important, learn the skills that could lead to productive partnerships between these institutions and engagement-oriented professors.” In their minds, civic education should no longer be a separate element but rather a standard that all institutions should strive to meet.

    Centers like the CCE are a great means by which to reverse the trend of disengaged graduate students that seems to pervade institutions of higher education, and Knutson & Lewis hope that models like GEO and the CCE can serve as an example for how all doctoral programs can help their students be more prepared to use their field of expertise as a tool to participate—and improve—civic life.

    The piece is a brief and fantastic read for anyone pursuing masters or doctoral degrees or, frankly, anyone who works in higher education. You can read the article by Dr. Knutson & Dr. Lewis or look at the whole HEX issue.

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    Engaged Graduate Student Association Receives TGS Community-Building Grant

    (posted 10/9/12)

    The Engaged Student Graduate Association (EGSA) has received a TGS Community-Building Grant to expand opportunities to connect civically-engaged graduate students across NU. We are excited to use this capacity to host special events, build web resources, and create networking opportunities among students, faculty and community-members. If you are interested in serving as an EGSA Officer, or joining our listserv, please reply to Ruth Martin at RuthMartin2019@u.northwestern.edu.

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    NU Celebrates Constitution Day: September 17, 2012

    (posted 9/12/12)

    redesignedsite

    In 2004, Congress, led by late Senator Robert Byrd, passed an amendment as part of the Omnibus spending bill, which recognizes September 17 as Constitution Day. This day of special recognition honors the ratification of the U.S. Constitution, which took place at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787. On Monday, September 17 universities across the country, including Northwestern, will recognize Constitution Day.

    Join us in celebrating this day by exploring the various resources available online at www.engage.northwestern.edu/constitution. The page includes links to websites commemorating the holiday, articles, free videos, quizzes and other information about the U.S. Constitution.

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    Graduate Students Explore Link Between Research and Community Engagement at Third Annual Community Research Workshop

    (posted 3/5/12)

    The Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) Graduate Student Planning Committee is thrilled to announce that the Third Annual Community Research Workshop (CRWIII) was a great success!

    Over 50 attendees turned out for this year’s conference on February 17th in the Wildcat Room at Norris. Attendees represented a broad range of disciplines, including history, design, English, education, engineering, anthropology, business, and community programs across the Chicago area. The program and PowerPoint presentations are available at www.engage.northwestern.edu/crwiii.

    The morning session focused on the nuts and bolts of community research, and was hosted by Jen Kauper-Brown, Director of the Alliance for Research in Chicagoland Communities. Jen discussed the range of community involvement in research, the benefits and challenges of engagement, and how to begin building partnerships. Jen was accompanied by two, co-presenters: Hyeyoung Lee, Director of Senior Services and Public Benefits at Korean American Community Services in Chicago, and David Victorson, Assistant Professor in the Department of Medical Social Sciences at the Feinberg School of Medicine. Hyeyoung helped attendees understand the benefits of community engaged research from the perspective of the community partner. David discussed the ways in which collaborating with community partners has enhanced his research.

    Following these discussions, graduate student presenters shared their experiences with community research. Andy Sabin, a recent graduate of the program in Communication Sciences and Disorders, discussed the applicability of his research on acoustics to hearing sciences and technologies. Andy suggested how science students can engage with the broader community through their research. Ananda Marin, a graduate student in the department of Learning Sciences, discussed her collaboration with the American Indian Center (AIC) of Chicago. Fellow researchers and AIC staff Lori Faber, Jasmine Alfonso, and Jannan Cotto joined her, sharing ways that their partnership furthers scholarship and community development. Lauren Slubowski, a graduate student in the department of Anthropology and a master’s candidate in the Program in Public Health at Feinberg, discussed some lessons she has learned thus far through working with a community for her dissertation research.

    After lunch, faculty representing the Humanities, Social Sciences, Learning Sciences, and Natural and Applied Sciences hosted breakout roundtable sessions. Table hosts included T.H. Breen, William Smith Mason Professor of American History and Director of the Chabraja Center for Historical Studies; Danny M. Cohen, a Lecturer at the School of Education and Social Policy and Commissioner of the Illinois Holocaust and Genocide Commission; Mesmin Destin, Assistant Professor in the department of Social Psychology and Human Development and Social Policy; Mike Kennedy, Director of Science in Society; Bill Savage, Distinguished Senior Lecturer in English; and Laurie Zoloth, Director of the Brady Scholars Program in Ethics and Civic Life. Students, staff, and faculty from many departments and programs came together for interdisciplinary discussion about engaging the community in research. The conversations were instructional, stimulating, and the first steps in building a graduate community focused on civic engagement.

    Based on feedback from this gathering, the Graduate Student Planning Committee at CCE plans to establish regular lunch meetings and brown bag talks to bring this graduate community together for continuing discussion. The graduate representatives of CCE hope to make the center a robust resource for graduate students interested in broadening the impact of their research.

    CCE Graduate Student Planning Committee:
    Eleanor Anderson
    Learning Sciences PhD Student
    Ruth Martin
    Comparative Literary Studies PhD Student
    Lauren Slubowski
    Anthropology/Public Health PhD Candidate
    Matilda Stubbs
    Anthropology PhD Student

    CCE Staff:
    Ellen Knutson
    Center for Civic Engagement, Graduate Engagement Opportunities

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    Going Beyond the Bean: Engage Chicago Participants Immerse Themselves in a Windy City Summer

    By Jane Merrill (SESP '12)
    (posted 10/31/11)

    Where can you learn about “inspiring examples of how to make sustainable change in the world we live in” and get the chance to make this change yourself? What program offers you ready access to the culture of Chicago, and simultaneously provides a community of “intelligent, creative, funny and diverse” students? Engage Chicago, run by NU’s Center for Civic Engagement in partnership with Chicago Field Studies, offers students all of these things each summer. The program consists of five basic components: an internship at a top Chicago non-profit, class with NU’s own Professor Jody Kretzmann, weekly experiential learning/field experiences, reflection time in seminars, and a vibrant learning community.

    One of this year’s participants, Katie Funderburg (WCAS ’14) says that one of the best parts about Engage Chicago was the familiarity it gave her with Chicago. "Before I did this program, Chicago seemed like this big, looming thing. You have to figure out how to get on and off the el, transfer trains, maybe take a bus... Now I think, Chicago’s not that far!” Although the new school year is only a month old, Katie says that she plans to go into Chicago much more, and even help her friends navigate public transportation.

    Another Engage Chicago alum, Visraant Iyer (WCAS ’12), who worked at the Pilsen office of the Chicago Legal Clinic, points to the real life work experience he gained as one of the most valuable takeaways of the program. “By the end of my internship,” he says, “I was expected to be able to synthesize a wide variety of precedential cases in support of a client, and write memos that suggested legal strategies my attorney could take in mounting a defense of the client.”

    Another participant, Diana Balitaan (SESP ’14) says that her experience has changed the way that she thinks about doing service. She worked at the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless, where they emphasized a model of connecting with people, rather than just giving handouts. This new model challenged her to think more broadly about homelessness, and has pushed her to stay involved with organizing back at Northwestern.

    Engage Chicago is open to students finishing their freshman, sophomore or junior years, and helps students balance an internship placement in a site that matches their academic or professional interests with a powerful learning experience that utilizes the entire city of Chicago as their classroom.

    Applications for Engage Chicago 2012 are now available! Click here to apply.

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    NU Celebrates Constitution Day

    (posted 9/7/11)

    redesignedsite

    In 2004, Congress, led by late Senator Robert Byrd, passed an amendment as part of the Omnibus spending bill, which recognizes September 17 (observed September 16 in 2011) as Constitution Day. This day of special recognition honors the ratification of the U.S. Constitution, which took place at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787. On Friday, September 16 universities across the country, including Northwestern, will recognize Constitution Day.

    Join us in celebrating this day by exploring the various resources available online at www.engage.northwestern.edu/constitution. The page includes links to websites commemorating the holiday, articles, free videos, quizzes and other information about the U.S. Constitution.

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    CCE Launches Redesigned Website

    (posted 5/1/11)

    redesignedsite

    In order to better connect students, staff, faculty and community members with CCE's programs and resources, the Center has redesigned its website, www.engage.northwestern.edu. The result is easier to navigate and more representative of the various opportunities available at CCE and beyond. The major redesigns are as follows:

    • Reorganization of site content:
      All of the content now falls into one of the below categories, as listed in the main menu bar at the top of the page. Each of the menu bar buttons now also features a drop-down menu for easier access to information:
      • About - General information including CCE's mission and staff
      • Programs - Index of all programs available at CCE
      • News & Events - Announcements, events and other CCE news
      • Resources - Online and offline tools to support people and groups interested in civic engagement
      • Information for - A constituent-specific guide to civic engagement at Northwestern
      • Contact - How to get in touch with the Center for Civic Engagement

    • Increased presence of CCE programs:
      As CCE has grown over the past couple of years, so has the number of programs it coordinates or cosponsors. To reflect this change, we have added visual "quick links" to the home page and an entire "programs" page that indexes all of the programs at CCE.

    • Development of the Civic Engagement Email Digest:
      A great way to keep informed about the many civic engagement events and opportunities at Northwestern and beyond is to subscribe to the Civic Engagement Email Digest. This weekly email reaches over a thousand students, staff, faculty, alumni and community members and contains information about events, deadlines and programs from all across campus. We have increased the digest's presence on engage.northwestern.edu in an effort to continue to develop the utility of this communicative tool.

    All of the above changes were made to help students, staff, faculty, alumni and community members better navigate the thriving culture of civic engagement at Northwestern. Let us know what you think! Drop us an email with your thoughts or suggestions at: engage@northwestern.edu.

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    "Lunch Line" Documentary Screening and Panel Discussion on April 28

    (posted 4/28/11)

    lunchlineThe documentary Lunch Line will be screened in the Block Museum Cinema (40 Arts Circle Drive, Evanston, IL) on Thursday, April 28. Doors open at 6pm and the screening begins at 6:30pm. Admission is free and seats are available on a first-come first-served basis.

    Click here for more information about the first screening.

    Lunch Line focuses on the national school lunch program by exploring its past, its current challenges, and its opportunities for the future. Leaders are interviewed from all sides of the issue, including government officials, school food service experts, activists, and students, including 6 culinary students from one of the toughest neighborhoods in Chicago as they set out to fix school lunch - and end up at the White House.

    To see the trailer visit the film's website: http://lunchlinefilm.com/

    Following the screening, there will be panel discussion and question and answer session with film co-directors Michael Graziano (a former NU doctoral film student) and Ernie Park; Chicago Tribune journalist Monica Eng; Northwestern Professor Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach; and Northwestern student Victor Esteban Fimbres.

    NOTE: There will also be a second screening of Lunch Line on April 30 at the Evanston Public Library at 2pm.

    Click here for more information about the second screening.

    The screening of this film was organized by the Center for Civic Engagement, in partnership with the Evanston Public Library and also the following departments at Northwestern: Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, American Studies, Radio, Television and Film, SESP, Environmental Policy and Culture, the Roosevelt Institute, and the Institute for Policy Research.

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    Community Research Workshop II Scheduled for April 15, 2011

    (posted 2/24/11)

    crwOn Friday, April 15, 2011 from 9:00am to 1:30pm the Community Research Workshop II will take place in the Norris University Center's Wildcat Room at Northwestern University.

    The Community Research Workshop II is organized for graduate students by graduate students with the purpose of offering direction, guidance, and networking opportunities for students who are interested in doing civically-engaged work that brings together scholars and community members as partners who can learn from one another. This interdisciplinary workshop will feature a panel of scholars and community partners who can speak to the challenges and strategies involved in community-based research and is designed to provide a forum for graduate student researchers to engage with one another and faculty on the topic of how researchers can develop strong, mutually beneficial relationships with communities and community organizations.

    More detailed information will follow, and registration will be available in early March. Email the Community Research Workshop Steering Committee at nu.communityresearch@gmail.com with any
    questions.

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    Tracy Kidder Delivers 'One Book' Keynote

    (posted 2/10/11, updated 2/11/11)


    kidder

    On Thursday, February 10 at 4:30pm in Harris Hall 107, Tracy Kidder delivered the One Book

    One Northwestern 2010-11 Keynote Address.

    The Pulitzer Prize-winning author discussed this year’s One Book One Northwestern selection, Mountains Beyond Mountains. The book, written by Kidder, details the story of Dr. Paul Farmer, a Harvard-trained physician who found remarkable ways to connect his intellect with a commitment to the public good, creating a more meaningful life for himself and making a tremendous impact on the world in the process. The talk took place in the auditorium of the newly renovated Harris Hall.

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    In Summer 2011, Gain Invaluable Work Experience While Living and Learning in One of the World's Most Dynamic Cities!

    (posted 12/15/10)

    Details are currently being finalized for the summer 2011 Engage Chicago program. Keep this opportunity in mind as you begin making plans for summer. Updated information and applications for the 2011 program will be posted online in early January

    ec class

    Engage Chicago (EC) gives students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the city of Chicago, while learning from NU faculty and community experts in diverse neighborhoods throughout the city. An immersive summer field study program run through CCE and Chicago Field Studies, EC takes advantage of the unique history, resources, culture and expertise the city has to offer, providing powerful learning experiences for students interested in public service and social change.

    Last summer EC students interned at organizations such as the Legal Assistance Foundation of Metropolitan Chicago, the Illinois Maternal & Child Health Coalition, and the Chicago Public Schools Office of School Turnaround. They explored the rich culture and history of Chicago and the theories and ideas behind community development work in CFS 397: Field Studies in Civic Engagement, taught by Professor John "Jody" Kretzmann.

    Field experiences are a unique component of Engage Chicago, complementing the work done in class and at internships. Highlights from EC 2010 included a talk by Newsweek columnist Jonathan Alter, a panel discussion with current and formerly homeless individuals at the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless, a tour of Eden Place, a project on sustainability and urban development in Chicago's Fuller Park neighborhood, and a visit with famed civil rights leader Reverend Jesse Jackson at the headquarters of his Chicago-based national advocacy organization, Rainbow/PUSH.

    Engage Chicago offers students the opportunity to:

    • Gain invaluable work experience at top organizations in Chicago
    • Earn course credit while learning among a community of peers
    • Experience daily life in the diverse, dynamic city of Chicago
    • Serve alongside leaders and organizations that make a difference
    • Learn first-hand about politics, history and methods of social change

     


    "This program stretched me and took me to places I never dreamed I'd set foot in and got me thinking about issues my own life experiences would say didn't concern me. It threw me outside of my comfort zone."

    -EC 2010 participant



    Details and applications for Engage Chicago 2011 will be available online in early January 2011. EC staff will hold info sessions for the program throughout winter quarter. In the meantime, to stay posted on EC announcements, "like us" on Facebook and feel free to contact Heidi Gross (heidi-gross@northwestern.edu), EC Assistant Coordinator, if you have any questions.  

    Engage Chicago
    One summer. One city. Experience of a lifetime.
    www.engagechicago.org

    "This program changed my future aspirations and what I want to do with my life!"
    -EC 2010 participant

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    CCE & Fellowships Info Session

    (posted 11/15/10)

    Come by 1813 Hinman on Monday, November 15 at 2:30pm for back-to-back info sessions on fellowship and civic engagement opportunities at Northwestern! 

    In the first half, the Office of Fellowships Associate Director Brad Zakarin will talk about fellowships, why you should consider them, and what goes into application processes. It’s never too soon to learn about exciting opportunities that you may want to apply for down the road. The Office of Fellowships helps students of all years identify and apply for funding for the following: independent public service projects, experiential learning opportunities in government and non-profits and tuition support for students committed to service-oriented careers.

    The second half will focus on the Center for Civic Engagement, which offers programs and opportunities for students looking to get more involved at Northwestern and beyond. Through an integration of academics with meaningful volunteer service, research and community partnerships, the Center supports students, faculty, staff and alumni as they enhance their own academic experiences while contributing to stronger communities and a more engaged university.  The session will cover various upcoming opportunities through the Center including the Evanston Civic Internship Program, the Certificate in Civic Engagement and Coffees with 8 Strangers. 
       
    These informal sessions, open to all Northwestern students, are a great opportunity to ask questions and learn more about great programs and services at Northwestern!  Email engage@northwestern.edu for more info. 

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    Register to Vote!

    (posted 9/29/10)

    Students, staff and faculty can register to vote in Illinois or their home state between the hours of 10am and 4pm at Northwestern's Center for Civic Engagement (1813 Hinman Ave. on the Evanston Campus, next to the Admissions Office). You must provide your state ID/driver's license number or the last four digits of your social security number. The deadline to register to vote at CCE is Tuesday, October 5 at 4pm.

    Voter registration tables will also be made available at the following places and times:

    • Thursday September 30
      9:45am - 12pm
      In front of Tech
    • Thursday September 30
      11am - 2pm
      Ground floor of Norris

    • Friday October 1
      9:45am - 12pm
      In front of Tech
    • Friday October 1
      11am - 2pm
      Ground floor of Norris

    ***Note: You can only register to vote in Illinois at the registration tables. If you would like to register to vote in a state other than Illinois, you will need to register at CCE (1813 Hinman).

    Questions? Email VoterRegNU@gmail.com

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    Apply for the GEO Community Practicum

    (posted 9/29/10)

    The Center for Civic Engagement is pleased to announce the Graduate Engagement Opportunities (GEO) Community Practicum program, which connects a credit-bearing seminar taught by an interdisciplinary team to a quarter long field-study or internship. This program is open to all PhD students who are interested in gaining hands-on experience beyond the walls of the academy. Through the support of The Graduate School, students are able to use a quarter of their NU funding to participate in this program.

    CCE is partnering with Chicago area cultural organizations, foundations, community organizations, policy institutes and other non-profits to develop this exciting learning opportunity. Students in the program will learn about topics such as citizenship, the scope of civic action and public work, the nature of public scholarship, and the role of public intellectuals in civic life. They will apply their seminar learning and expertise to the civic sphere. The program promotes a scholarship of engagement that creates partnerships between the university and the community to deepen knowledge and address community needs.

    The first cohort of students will be placed Winter 2011. If you are interested in participating in the program please fill out an application and send a copy of your current resume or cv to Ellen Knutson (e-knutson@northwestern.edu) by October 15, 2010.

    For more information contact Ellen Knutson (e-knutson@northwestern.edu; 847-467-1367).

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    NU Celebrates Constitution Day

    (posted 9/16/10)

    On Friday, September 17th universities across the country, including Northwestern, will recognize Constitution Day.  In 2004, Congress, led by late Senator Robert Byrd, passed an amendment as part of the Omnibus spending bill, that created this day of special recognition in honor of the ratification of the U.S. Constitution, which took place at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787.

    Join us in celebrating this day by exploring the various resources available online at www.engage.northwestern.edu/constitutionday. The page includes links to websites commemorating the holiday, articles, free videos, quizzes and other information about the U.S. Constitution.

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    A Look Back at CCE's First Year

    (posted 6/1/10)

    On behalf of the entire staff at the CCE, thanks to everyone who helped make our first year a big success!

    We enter the summer excited with the progress made towards a more engaged Northwestern with an increasing number of quality opportunities to connect classroom and community. Here are some of the highlights of our first academic year:

    • Jumpstart: Jumpstart provides a successful model of well-structured, university-community tutoring partnerships. In Jumpstart's first year at Northwestern, 25 students devoted to over 6000 hours helping local preschoolers improve their literacy skills.

    • Conference on Civic Engagement: CCE partnered with Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC) for a conference titled Leadership for a Religiously Diverse World. Over several days leaders and activists from across the country—including Reverend Jim Wallis and Eboo Patel, the executive director of IFYC—gave talks and workshops on the role faith often plays in service. The conference was followed by two new courses for NU undergrads on faith and service taught by Patel in partnership with NU faculty.

    • Coffee with Strangers: In the fall and spring, CCE hosted a series of opportunities for students, faculty, staff and community members to meet and talk informally about their own perception of what civic engagement is and what makes it successful.

    • Evanston Civic Internship Program: CCE, together with Chicago Field Studies and the Center for Leadership launched this new campus-community program, which gives undergraduates the opportunity to intern with a member of Evanston city council, earning academic credit while getting a first-hand look at the daily workings of local government.

    • Community Research Workshop: This workshop brought together graduate students from a host of different schools (within and outside of Northwestern) to discuss the role of the public intellectual and exchange strategies for effectively and responsibly partnering with communities in academic research.

    • Engage Chicago: In collaboration with Chicago Field Studies and the Summer School, CCE developed a new immersive summer program in Chicago. Engage Chicago is an incredible opportunity for students to work for a community organization while studying the culture, history and complex issues that make up the windy city. Undergraduates from Northwestern and schools across the country will kick off the first year of this program later in June.

    • Public Interest Program: The Public Interest Program has already placed over a dozen oustanding graduating seniors and recent alums at top nonprofits in Chicago and Washington DC. The participants receive a year-long, paid fellowship, mentoring from other NU alums along with other networking and professional development opportunities.

    • One Book One Northwestern: As you may know, CCE is coordinating One Book One Northwestern 2010-11. Next year's book, Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder, will act as a touchstone for a campus-wide conversation on the variety of ways people make a difference in the lives of others while finding meaning in their own.

    Of course, none of this would be possible without the hard work and support of the many students, staff and faculty who make up the dynamic and thriving culture of engagement at Northwestern. We thank you for your efforts and look forward to working with you in the years to come.

    Have a great summer!

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    Fall Internships in Evanston City Government

    (posted 5/18/10)

    The City of Evanston, in partnership with CCE, the Center for Leadership, and Chicago Field Studies, is looking for hard-working, dedicated NU students with a sincere interest in public service to intern for course credit in city government.

    Past interns have worked with Evanston's City Manager, several aldermen, and the coordinator of the City of Evanston Youth Initiative. Opportunities are available for students to bring their own interests to the internship.

    The deadline for the fall internships has passed. Click here for more information.

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    Coffee with Eight Strangers Returns to CCE

    (posted 5/18/10)

    Coffee with Eight Strangers, offers an informal opportunity to mingle, network and exchange ideas with others who share an interest in service. The program had a successful debut last fall. A second series of coffees is planned for the end of May.

    Attendees enjoy casual conversation over coffee and treats with a random assortment of Northwestern students, joined by faculty, administrators and staff, as well as community members from Evanston and Chicago. Coffee with Strangers is a great way to meet new people, find out what others are working on, and celebrate our community.

    Registration for the spring coffees is now closed. The coffees will resume in the 2010-11 academic year.  

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    CCE to Coordinate One Book One Northwestern 2010-11

    (posted 5/11/10)

    Tracy Kidder's Mountains Beyond Mountains, a close look at the life and work of Dr. Paul Farmer, has been chosen for One Book One Northwestern 2010-11.

    Click here to read the press release.

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    Apply to be a 2010-11 Civic Engagement Fellow

    (posted 4/22/10)

    The Center for Civic Engagement is now accepting applications for the Civic Engagement Fellowship and CCE's Steering Committee student members.

    Each spring, the Center for Civic Engagement selects three to five outstanding students to participate in the Civic Engagement Fellowship. This fellowship is a competitive, paid, one-year program that trains undergraduate leaders to promote quality service learning and civic engagement at Northwestern. Fellows serve as liaisons between the Center and the student body, actively working to support service learning organizations and help students navigate the many engagement opportunities on campus. In addition to the fellowship, CCE appoints two students every year to the Center's Steering Committee.

    These positions are excellent opportunities for students to get more involved on campus and help shape the future of civic engagement at Northwestern. Click here for detailed information and to apply.

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    CCE & Office of Fellowships Info Sessions

    (posted 4/22/10)

    On Tuesday, April 27 at 4pm the Center for Civic Engagement will host back-to-back info sessions on fellowship and civic engagement opportunities at Northwestern.

    In the first hour, the Office of Fellowships Associate Director Brad Zakarin and recent fellowship winners will talk about fellowships, why you should consider them, and what goes into application processes. It’s never too soon to learn about exciting opportunities that you may want to apply for down the road. The Office of Fellowships helps students of all years identify and apply for funding for the following: independent public service projects, experiential learning opportunities in government and non-profits and tuition support for students committed to service-oriented careers.

    The second hour will focus on the Center for Civic Engagement, which offers programs and

    opportunities for students looking to get more involved at Northwestern and beyond. Through an integration of academics with meaningful volunteer service, research and community partnerships, the Center supports students, faculty, staff and alumni as they enhance their own academic experiences while contributing to stronger communities and a more engaged university. 
       
    These informal sessions will take place at CCE at 1813 Hinman Ave. in Evanston. They are open to all Northwestern students, and are a great opportunity to ask questions and learn more about programs and services at Northwestern! 

    Email engage@northwestern.edu for more info.     

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    Paul Rogat Loeb Speaks at NU

    (posted 4/12/10, updated 4/20/10)

    Paul Rogat Loeb is the author of the award-winning books on civic engagement, Soul of a Citizen, The Impossible Will Take a Little While, and Generation at the Crossroads, will draw on these books to explore how we can help our students learn to take responsibility for our common future. He examines lessons learned from the citizen movements of the past as well as how citizen involvement can provide a sense of connection and purpose that is often missing in our busy lives. To learn more about Paul Loeb and his books, go to: www.paulloeb.org

    On Monday, April 19, Loeb lead a series of workshops at Northwestern examining the importance of civic engagement in today's world. The schedule was as follows:

    10am - 11:30amTeaching for Engagement: A discussion with author Paul Loeb

    University Hall Room 102 • 1897 Sheridan Road • Evanston, IL

    (for faculty and staff)

    Do you want your students more engaged in larger community issues? Talk with author Paul Loeb about the barriers to involvement and how you can help your students overcome them. Loeb gets beyond prevailing media stereotypes to understand the college student’s struggle to find their place in a challenging world. Loeb examines students' concepts of social, political, and environmental responsibility, what matters in their lives, and how they view themselves in relation to a larger human community. Loeb asks how students and citizens in general can gain the moral, political, and intellectual tools to take responsibility for the future and explores how faculty and professional staff can help in this journey. This program is co-sponsored by Northwestern’s University Residential Life department and the Searle Center for Teaching Excellence. Registration Required. Register here: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FKSHWLV

    7pm Living with Conviction in Challenging Times: Why Civic Engagement Matters

    Ryan Family Auditorium • First Floor Technological Institute • 2145 Sheridan Road • Evanston, IL

    (open to the public)

    Author Paul Rogat Loeb shares the stories of ordinary people doing extraordinary things, and explores how we can make our voices heard and actions count in a time when we're told neither matter. Based on 35 years of Loeb’s work examining the psychology and spirituality of community involvement, he examines: How people get involved in larger common issues and what prevents them from getting involved; How they burn out in exhaustion or maintain their commitment for the long haul; What we can learn from the citizen movements of the past; How citizen involvement can give a powerful sense of connection and purpose that is often missing in American’s overloaded lives; and “Virtual activism,”  how new technologies can help or hinder social engagement. This event is co-sponsored by Northwestern's University Residential Life, Residential Colleges, Office of Student Community Service, and the Center for Civic Engagement.

    Should you have any questions, please contact:

    Virginia A. Koch

    Senior Assistant Director

    University Residential Life

    Phone: 847-491-3541

    v-koch@northwestern.edu

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    Arts Impact Lives at Juvenile Detention Center

    (posted 3/30/10, updated 4/7/10)

    On Tuesday, April 6 at 7pm in the Library Forum Room, the Center for Civic Engagement hosted a free screening of Girls on the Wall, a documentary that examines the impact artistic expression has on a group of teenage girls at a juvenile detention center just west of Chicago.

    In the film, the girls get a shot at redemption in a most unlikely form: a musical based on their lives. As they write and stage their play, the girls must re-live their crimes, reclaim their humanity, and take a first step toward breaking free of the prison system.

    The viewing was followed by a Q&A with Meade Palidofsky and Nancy McCarthy, directors of Storycatchers Theater, the theater group featured in the film. The event was a thought-provoking look at theatre, music, the youth prison system, and the way arts can be used as a powerful force for social change.

    Click below to watch the film's trailer:

    For more information please visit the film's website www.girlsonthewallmovie.com. Email engage@northwestern.edu with any questions.

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    The Deadline to Apply to Engage Chicago 2010 Has Passed

    (posted 2/19/2010, updated 4/5/10)

    Engage Chicago is an eight-week residential summer course for outstanding undergraduate students completing their freshman, sophomore, or junior year. The program combines immersive experiential learning with coursework taught by Northwestern faculty and thoughtful reflection led by Northwestern staff. Engage Chicago is sponsored by the Center for Civic Engagement in partnership with the Chicago Field Studies program at Northwestern University.

    By building on all the great history, resources, culture and expertise the city of Chicago has to offer, Engage Chicago provides powerful learning experiences for students interested in public service and urban life.

    • Earn course credit while learning among a community of peers
    • Experience daily life in the diverse, dynamic city of Chicago
    • Serve alongside leaders and organizations that make a difference
    • Learn first-hand about politics, history and methods of social change

    For program details and an online application, visit our website at:

    www.engagechicago.org

    The deadline to apply has passed. Late applications will be considered as space permits.

    If you have any further questions, feel free to contact us.  

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    Spring Internships with City Council

    (posted 2/11/2010)

    Take what you learn in the classroom into the real world. Learn about the inner workings of city government and gain hands-on experience diving into local politics by experiencing the day-to-day life of local government and working closely with City of Evanston officials.

    The City of Evanston, in partnership with CCE, the Center for Leadership, and Chicago Field Studies, is looking for hard-working, dedicated NU students with a sincere interest in public service to intern for course credit in city government.

    Past interns have worked with Evanston's City Manager, several aldermen, and the coordinator of the City of Evanston Youth Initiative. Opportunities are available for students to bring their own interests to the internship.

    Click here to apply.
    The deadline is Friday, February 19

    Questions? Email us at engage@northwestern.edu

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    Exploring the Digital Humanities

    (posted 2/11/2010)

    CCE welcomes David Theo Goldberg, Director of the Humanities Research Institute at the University of California (Irvine) and co-author of The Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age, for a lecture and discussion on "Networking Knowledge." All members of the Northwestern community are invited.

    This event is the latest in the "Engaged Humanities Scholar as Public Intellectual" workshop series, cosponsored by the Center for Civic Engagement, The Graduate School, and the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities. The series, organized by Michael Kramer and affiliated with HASTAC (the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory, located at http://www.hastac.org), focuses on the emerging role of digital technologies in mediating between the humanities and communities beyond campus. For more information, announcements of events, and to join an email list, visit the blog, http://engagedhumanities.wordpress.com.

    Please join us!

    "Networking Knowledge"
    David Theo Goldberg
    Thursday, February 25
    5:15 pm
    Kresge 2-370

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    Helping Haiti

    The Center for Civic Engagement shares the sadness felt by so many in response to the devastating earthquake that struck Haiti.  As an office committed to the idea that service to those in need is a responsibility that we all share, we support the outpouring of responses - here at Northwestern and globally - to a tragedy of such magnitude.  

    In this spirit we encourage you to support aid agencies working to provide relief in the wake of this disaster.  Northwestern's Department of Latin and Caribbean Area Studies has compiled a list of organizations providing emergency relief.  Click here to view that list.

    Also, Evanston has a sizeable Haitian community, and a variety of local groups are helping coordinate community relief efforts. You can learn more about supporting these local community efforts by clicking here.

    In addition, Northwestern students involved with GlobeMed, an Evanston-based non-profit that supports grassroots health initiatives in nations throughout the world, are working  with Partners in Health to raise money for their efforts in Haiti.  Donations may be made to Partners in Health via Northwestern's online fundraising page by clicking here.

    As additional projects and initiatives evolve, please know NU students are working to help coordinate student responses with a campaign called NU Stands with Haiti. We encourage members of the NU community to continue to work together to try and amplify the impact of our collective support.  

    Finally, please remember that the after effects of this tragedy will continue long after this story disappears from the day's top headlines.  We will continue to support initiatives to respond to this crisis, and urge everyone in the NU community to continue actively supporting relief efforts in the days ahead. 

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    New Faith & Service Course Offered this Winter

    CCE is pleased to announce a new course on faith and service being offered for undergraduates this winter.

    A few months ago, we partnered with Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC) to facilitate their sixth annual conference on Interfaith Youth Work here on campus. Hundreds of students and young leaders from around the world gathered on Northwestern’s Evanston campus to explore the connections between diverse faiths and the role religion often plays in service work.

    The conversation continues this winter in SESP 351: Introduction to Faith and Service, a new course being introduced at Northwestern this winter quarter. The course will be team taught by Tim Stevens, Northwestern’s University Chaplain and Jody Kretzmann, Research Associate Professor in the School of Education & Social Policy (SESP).

    Introduction to Faith and Service is a tremendous opportunity to learn from and with leading experts about how faith informs service across many different religious traditions here in the U.S. and throughout the world. There are no prerequisites for this course, and it is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors from any school/major interested in learning about the intersection of faith and service. Space is limited.  

    See below for the course listing. For more information, send us an email at engage@northwestern.edu.

    SESP 351                   
    Introduction to Faith and Service
    Instructors: Tim Stevens, University Chaplain, and Jody Kretzmann, SESP

    This course will be an introduction to the importance of service within the central faith traditions in the United States. Built around presentations by experts in service within each tradition, students will learn the basic differences and similarities between the traditions. The emphasis will be on identifying the perspectives on service with the traditions and finding commonalities across traditions where they exist or have the potential to be built.

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    Medill Service-Learning Course Bridges Language Gaps

    In the interdisciplinary course, Connecting with Immigrant and Multi-Ethnic Communities, Professor Jack Doppelt and his students use multimedia storytelling as a way to empower and connect immigrants across cultural lines. By working closely with local immigrant populations and foreign-language newspapers, Professor Doppelt and his students address the needs of surrounding communities while enhancing their own understanding of journalism, storytelling and immigration issues.

    Doppelt’s class focuses on the global immigration phenomenon, strategies for telling multimedia immigrant stories and the creation of a social network across ethnic lines.  Using the Chicago metropolitan area, students report on immigrant experiences and develop a forum for community-based personal narratives.

    The course has created an online community, immigrantconnect.org, for immigrants and second-generation children in and around Chicago that has students reporting, writing and publishing multi-media stories on immigrant experiences, working with community-based teachers, librarians and social service professionals on how to have immigrants and their children tell and publish their own stories, and researching and learning about the international migration phenomenon both historically and contemporaneously.

    Student translators are currently needed to work with the class, members of local ethnic media, and immigrant communities to translate these stories into a variety of languages.  This group of translators will serve as a “Translation Corps” at Northwestern to help with related projects and potentially serve organizations in the community in need of foreign-language speakers.  Interested native speakers of non-English languages should contact the Center for Civic Engagement at engage@northwestern.edu.

    For more information please visit the Immigrant Connect website

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    Students, Faculty and Community Members Meet for Coffee at CCE

    A new social event at the Center for Civic Engagement, Coffee with Eight Strangers, offers an opportunity to mingle, network and exchange ideas with others who share an interest in service.  

    Attendees enjoy casual conversation over coffee, hot chocolate and treats with a random assortment of Northwestern students, joined by faculty, administrators and staff, as well as community members from Evanston and Chicago. Coffee with Strangers is a great way to meet new people, find out what others are working on, and celebrate our community.

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    NU Students Intern at the Civic Center

    Beginning winter quarter, the Evanston City Council will employ the aid of part-time interns to address constituent concerns, assist with legislative research, and map Evanston's assets and needs. For information on applying for the spring quarter, email engage@northwestern.edu.

    Through a partnership with Northwestern University's Center for Civic Engagement, the City of Evanston is looking for hard-working, dedicated students with a sincere interest in public service to intern in city government. Internships last one academic quarter and can be taken for credit hours through Chicago Field Studies.

    Student interns will have an opportunity to take their classroom learning into the real world and better understand the inner workings of local government by working closely with City of Evanston officials.

    Intern responsibilities may include:

    • Assisting with legislative and historical research
    • Attending and reporting on city committee meetings
    • Determining how to better address and meet constituent concerns
    • Mapping the assets and needs of Evanston's communities, focusing on specific issues

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    Upcoming Info Sessions for Civic-Minded Students

    The Civic Engagement Certificate Program and Summer Field Studies Program will hold info sessions at CCE in late October and early November.

    On Tuesday, October 27 and Wednesday, October 28 at 1pm students will have the opportunity to learn about the Civic Engagement Certificate Program. This two-year, five-quarter program gives students a deeper understanding of the forces that affect communities and a more thorough grasp of how to achieve positive change. The program is open to all Northwestern freshmen, sophomores and juniors. Visit their website for more information.

    On Wednesday, November 4th and Thursday, November 5th at 1pm staff will provide information and answer questions about Summer Field Studies. These credit-bearing off-campus programs supplement classroom learning and allow students to expand their skills at locations throughout the United States. Summer Field Studies is open to all Northwestern students.  Click here to learn more. 

    Both sessions will take place at the Center for Civic Engagement at 1813 Hinman Avenue in Evanston, Il.

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    Interfaith Conference Workshops Announced

    A schedule and description of the Interfaith Youth Core’s conference workshops is now available.  Northwestern students, staff and faculty who wish to attend a workshop should pick up a guest pass immediately prior to the desired workshop at the IFYC info desk outside the Louis room in Norris.  Passes are limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Click here for a .pdf file of the conference workshop schedule. 

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    Open House Kicks Off First Year for CCE

    The Center for Civic Engagement begins its inaugural year as a new hub for engagement and service learning at Northwestern. To celebrate the opening of the Center, local community members and Northwestern students, faculty and staff are invited to an open house between 4:30pm and 6pm on Thursday, October 22nd, 2009 at 1813 Hinman Avenue

    Attendees will have the opportunity to see our new space, meet our staff and learn about civic engagement programs at Northwestern. Representatives from Jumpstart, Chicago Field Studies, the Center for Leadership and other programs will be available to answer questions. Refreshments will be served. 

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    CCE Hosts Interfaith Conference

    The Center for Civic Engagement invites the Northwestern community to attend the Interfaith Youth Core’s 6th Conference on Interfaith Youth Work. This year’s conference, titled “Leadership for a Religiously Diverse World,” examines the importance of religious pluralism and the role faith often plays in service work.   

    Dr. Eboo Patel, founder and executive director of Interfaith Youth Core, will speak at the conference’s opening plenary session on Sunday October 25th at 7pm in Pick-Staiger Auditorium. Dr. Patel serves on the Advisory Council of the White House Office of Faith Based and Neighborhood Partnerships and is a contributor to The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune and National Public Radio.   

    The keynote speaker of this opening event will be Reverend Jim Wallis, President and Executive Director of Sojourners. Reverend Wallis is the author of Reviving Faith & Politics in a Post-Religious Right America and the best selling God’s Politics: Why the Right Gets it Wrong and the Left Doesn’t Get it. His columns appear in major newspapers across the country, and he has been a guest on Meet the Press, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The O’Reilly Factor among other news programs. 

    A limited amount of free tickets to the opening session are available at the Center for Civic Engagement at 1813 Hinman Avenue. Limit two tickets per Wildcard.   

    The conference will close with an afternoon of service on Tuesday October 27th beginning at 2:30pm in Louis Hall, Norris Student Center. This event is free and Northwestern community members are encouraged to attend. Service projects will take place across Evanston and will involve conference attendees from around the world. IFYC will provide transportation. Students interested in participating in the service activity should email Amber Hacker to reserve a spot.   

    In addition, complimentary passes will be made available for Northwestern students, staff and faculty looking to attend the conference workshops. Passes may be picked up immediately prior to the desired workshop at the IFYC info desk outside the Louis room in Norris. Click here for a schedule of workshops or visit Interfaith Youth Core’s web site for more information on the conference.  

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    CCE Presents New Program on Public Intellectuals

    What does civic engagement mean to a graduate student at Northwestern University?  Volunteering, voting and occasionally venting (either online or in person) all come to mind.  A harder question is: How can Northwestern University strengthen that engagement, making it both more intelligent and effective?  The new Center for Civic Engagement offers a year-long discussion and debate on the topic, designed to enhance the quality of that engagement for our graduate students now and as they go on to pursue their careers.  These workshops, lectures and forums are designed by and for graduate students with the goal of continuing the dialogue for several years to come. We thank The Graduate School for supporting this endeavor and look forward to working with graduate students to create more opportunities to help them be productive and engaged citizens.

    The program kicks off with a research workshop, “The Engaged Humanities Scholar as
    Public Intellectual,” cosponsored by the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, which will center on debates about the usefulness of undergraduate and graduate education in the humanities and the potential role of the humanities scholar in the wider community.

    Check back here for information on future events.

    The Engaged Humanities Scholar Research Workshop 

    Preliminary Meeting: Engaged Humanities Scholar as Public Intellectual Research Workshop

    Monday, October 12th, 3-5pm
    Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities Seminar Room, Kresge Hall, 2-370
    Refreshments served

     

    “The Left at War: Arguing with Ourselves, 2001-03″
     A Case Study in the Role of Public Intellectuals

    A Discussion with Michael Bérubé
    Friday, October 16th, 3-5pm
    Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities Seminar Room, Kresge Hall, 2-370
    Refreshments served

     

    “The Utility of the Arts and Humanities”

    A Brunch Seminar
    Saturday, October 17th, 11am-1pm
    Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities Seminar Room, Kresge Hall 2-370
    Brunch served

    For more information and to join the research workshop email list, visit our blog.

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    CCE and AmeriCorps Bring New National Tutoring Program to NU

    Beginning this fall, the Center for Civic Engagement, in partnership with Jumpstart and the Corporation for National Service, will host a model early childhood tutoring program utilizing Northwestern students as community tutors.

    Since its founding in 1993, Jumpstart has successfully partnered college students with preschool children in an effort to improve the quality of early childhood education. College students and other community volunteers are trained to serve as model tutors and mentors for children in low-income neighborhoods.

    CCE is very excited to bring this important work to our community. Under the direction of Heidi Gross, Jumpstart at Northwestern will foster healthy relationships with local tutoring centers and offer training support for existing programs on campus. Students may participate as part of their campus work study job, or as volunteers.

    In addition, participants in Jumpstart are eligible to earn an AmeriCorps education award that provides additional funds for college or graduate school.

    For more information about Jumpstart, please contact Heidi Gross at heidi-gross@northwestern.edu.

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    First Class of NU Civic Engagement Fellows Announced

    Northwestern’s new Center for Civic Engagement is pleased to announce its first class of undergraduate Civic Engagement Fellows. This summer, a group of five outstanding Northwestern undergraduates, representing a variety of different schools and interests, were selected to be the Center's inaugural Fellows.

    Throughout the 2009-10 academic year they will serve as vital liaisons between the Center and the student body, actively working to promote civic engagement amongst their peers.

    The 2009-2010 Civic Engagement Fellows are:

    Kristen Cragwall

    Senior, School of Communications

    Margy LaFreniere

    Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

    Parvathi Santhosh-Kumar

    Senior, Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences

    Lauren Troy

    Senior, School of Education & Social Policy

    Stefani Weiss

    Senior, School of Education & Social Policy

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    Service Learning & Civic Engagement at NU

    During New Student Week, CCE will host two, hour-long panels on Civic Engagement and Public Service opportunities at Northwestern for incoming freshmen. The panels, made up of the Center's five new Civic Engagement Fellows, will serve to orient new students about the various engagement activities at Northwestern.

    The event is an opportunity for new students to hear the perspectives of upperclassmen who have integrated meaningful community experiences into their academic studies.

    The New Student Week Civic Engagement and Public Service Panels will take place at 1:30pm and 2:45pm on Friday, September 18th in Room 208 of the Norris University Center.

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